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  5. "Zij kan fietsen."

"Zij kan fietsen."

Translation:She can bike.

October 15, 2014

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterJB1

"She can cycle" makes more sense to me. People don't say "I bike" very often.

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daneosaurus

Why is this "she" and not "they"? I think the fact that it's "fietsen" and not"fietst" threw me off.

October 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenkvist
  • Zij kan fietsen (she can ride a bike)
  • Zij kunnen fietsen (they can ride a bike)

Same as here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5020220. The persoonsvorm (finite verb) is different depending on the subject.

October 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daneosaurus

I see. Thank you for answering all my many questions. Very helpful.

October 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

Look at the verb "kunnen". Ze kan... = She can... Ze kunnen = They can...

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vogiama

kan and kunt....what is their diffrence?

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK
  • Kan - 1st or 3rd person singular or second person singular (informal)
  • Kunt - 2nd person singular (formal)
November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vogiama

Thank you! :)

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michaelrei402379

Zij kan fietsen = she can cycle Zij kunt fietsen = she wants to cycle

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StudentTaal1

What's the meaning of Kan in this case? Being able to bike or having the skill as in english?

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

I think what you mean to ask is, is this about having skill, or having permission?

The answer is that this is an isolated sentence in a language learning program. Absent any other clues, we should translate "kan" as "can".

Strictly speaking, that means you are asking about skill, not permission, which in English would be (strictly speaking) "May she ride a bike?"

November 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lonja14

You need to know that BIKE (Bicycle) is a noun and CYCLE (or To Cycle) is a verb.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

The word "bike" can also be a verb, at least in standard American English. For example, it is listed as such in the 1992 American Heritage dictionary.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashutoshkhoba

if biking is Fietsen as plural, why can we not use they instead of she?

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Look at kan, not fietsen. Kan is the first verb so that's the one that agree with the noun (just like in English - e.g. She wants to run only "wants" gets the "s"). The "plural" form of kan is kunnen.

"fietsen" is not actually the plural form of the verb here at all, it's the infinitive (like the "to" form in English). The infinitive and plural form of the verb is the same, just like in English.

November 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adnejossing

There should be an explaination here. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5020220

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meryle11

"Bike" as a verb is not very elegant. I like "ride a bike" or "ride a bicycle" (more formal)

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26

'bike' is not properly a verb. Bike is a noun. You RIDE a bike. So 'She can bike' is like saying 'She can skipping rope'.

April 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMerrie

It is both a verb and a noun: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/bike. The usage differs between different English speaking countries, so it is possible that it is not used in your country.

April 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

Deb, "bike" as a verb is in my 1992 American Heritage dictionary -- 27 years ago.

Of course, you are free in your own speech to say "ride a bike" instead, which is also perfectly fine.

April 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26

Except it isn't. There are multiple cases where Duo only accepts the answer if I use bike where it should be 'ride'.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

Perhaps DL will accept "bicycle" as a verb, if you don't like "bike", and if DL will not accept "cycle".

(I don't know, because I always write "bike" for both the noun and the verb -- saves keystrokes!)

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tracey843948

As an Australian speaker, I would always use 'ride' as well, but Duo doesn't like it, and I find 'bike' clunky, so I use 'cycle' instead, which I've never had any trouble with in these exercises.

November 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete15454

Audio is messed up on this one, the fast audio clearly says "Zij KanT fietsen". Reported.

August 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lonja14

She can also "GO BIKING".

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

The phrase "go biking" suggests to me that "bike" is being used as a verb, at least in the -ing form. I thought you were in the camp that believes "bike" should only be a noun ...

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donaldjmccann

not sure why this answer is incorrect - "she can bicycle"

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaybekwa

to bicycle is not a verb. to bike is the correct verb.

January 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donaldjmccann

"I bicycle all over town" or "I bicycled across America." (which I did) are perfectly valid English expressions.

January 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaybekwa

I biked all over town sounds more natural. What dialect do you speak?

January 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donaldjmccann

I was born in England and live in Canada. Pretty common expressions in both places.

January 27, 2015
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