1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Avete dei progetti stasera?"

"Avete dei progetti stasera?"

Translation:Do you have plans this evening?

June 17, 2013

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loveinsky

the most useful sentence so far


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLyons85

"Have you any plans this evening?" is incorrect. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordon_gregory

Looks good to me. Have you reported?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Twoquiche

It's not incorrect. Its perfectly normal in UK English. Report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuioyuio

We can say either Do you have any plans this evening? or Have you got any plans this evening?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john419502

Both are correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yakutsk38

'Do you have any plans for this evening' also rejected. It is the expression I would use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

It is correct. Please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Because English requires the verb "to do" in questions. "Have you something?" is only used in informal contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/googlyeyedfrog

it's similar to when you say "delle mele" to mean "some apples". So I think it's like the unspoken some in this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celestedow

I answered: Do you have some projects this evening. And it was counted correct. So I believe googlyeyedfrog is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notesurfer

I believe that "dei" reflects the plural "progetti."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HydraBianca

From what I know you actually can't just say just say "mele", "pregetti" or any plural name without either {le,i, gli..} or {dei, delle..}. it is actually the indefinite article, which exists for plurals as well in Italian. And yes, for some reason Duolingo completely ignored this rule.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sapolion

What's the difference between "progetti" and "piani" for "plans"? Or are they synonyms?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatherineT463851

I believe piano is like a plan for a building structure, while progetto is a thing to do, can be a work project or evening projects, which becomes the more generic "plans" in English (as the connotation for project is that you have some sort of work).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jadecgn

Maybe it's like "do you have any plans tonight"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edcardiff

Why is 'have you any plans this evening' incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

It's not incorrect you should report it. Duo doesn't always have all versions in its database. See here for hints and Guidelines: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4821654 https://www.duolingo.com/comment/ 1426103


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catia9

DL doesn't seem to like the word 'any' here - I just got it wrong again. I don't know why it isn't accepted - any ideas, anyone?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Duolingo usually does not accept the informal usage of the conjugated verb "to have" in an interrogative/question, without the auxiliar verb "to do".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sriram385

Is this how native Italians say "What plans for the night" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LunarGirl100

What about 'Have you some plans this evening?" with dei = some


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe
  • "any" must be used instead of "some" in this context
  • "to have" requires the auxiliar verb "to do" in interrogative sentences

"Do you have any plans (for) this evening" is correct and means the same as the sentence without "any".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bepe0

have you and have you got have the same meaning in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SDibRX2L

Five years later it looks as if Duolingo still doesn't accept perfectly valid British English alternatives: "Do you have any plans this evening?" is a correct translation of "Avete dei progetti stasera?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

It is correct. If it was rejected, please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinDocke1

I answered "have you plans for this evening" which has served me well.in the uk ...but this was not allowed ? How does one report these issues


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Duolingo usually does not accept the informal usage of the conjugated verb "to have" in the interrogative/negative, without the auxiliary verb "to do".

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.