https://www.duolingo.com/MagAonghusa

Danish Grammar

MagAonghusa
  • 25
  • 23
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

So far I like it!

I've only done a few lessons but it seems great so far. No verb conjugations for person or number. Only two genders but one of them is "common" and 80-90% of the vocab I've learned so far are common gender. I suppose with English being my native language the Germanic languages will come easier. So far though I've found the grammar to be much easier than Spanish, French and especially Irish.

I'm enjoying Danish very much and can't wait for Swedish to move to beta!

Hej hej! Farvel!

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/isoregon

yes this is definitely true, but the difficulties come with adjectives having to match nouns and obviously memorizing all of the endings of nouns (en vs et, ene vs erne vs totally irregular). i think the difficulty of danish is that there are a lot of things that just need to be memorized, and then there is the issue of pronunciation... but for just writing and reading, danish couldnt be a whole lot simpler

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

There's a simple solution to worrying about noun endings and agreement of adjectives with nouns in Danish - study Russian (or even better, Czech). Now, those are languages that know how to inflect! Doing Danish is like being on vacation (so far).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
Bluthund
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1499

*or Finnish/Estonian. I think they have 14 cases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
  • 18
  • 18
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

But at least Finnish doesn't have any genders ;D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

I don't think they're actually cases, if that makes you feel any better - postpositions, like Hungarian (the advantage being that for a given use, you don't have to learn half-a-dozen variants. Nobody complains seriously about the number of prepositions in English and Danish, after all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/landsend
landsend
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 1492

I also wouldn't take this number too serious, a lot of what is done with prepositions in other languages can be done with "cases" in Finnish and thus drives the case count up. But for a lot of things even Finns use prepositions instead of the cases.

Well, that means you need to learn both ;-).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tani17
tani17
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 1470

the "d" is next to impossible for an English speaker. I lived there for a summer and they still laughed at my pronunciation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifritism

There's always one sound, isn't there? Just a slight shame it is such a prevalent one ;) I've been studying in the UK for almost two years now, and I cannot say z. Magazine. Zoo. None of my Danish friends here can. I'm not saying it's impossible, just that the sound doesn't exist, you know? I'd definitely be saying it right, otherwise!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MusingThoughts

Wow cool

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tani17
tani17
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 1470

Agree. I find Danish words most similar to the common forms of English words than are the French (hus, bog and hest for house, book and horse rather than maison, livre and cheval)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

And that rule you were supposed to learn in school about not ending a sentence with a preposition? Or using the accusative case for a subject in initial position? ( - Who's there? - Me. Seriously, have you ever heard anybody say "I"? "It is I"? ) Latin grammarians did their best to make English behave properly (i.e., follow Latin rules of grammar), but its German roots still emerged on the surface every time they looked the other way. One reason Danish feels so liberating, I think.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MusingThoughts

That is because Danish and English are both Germanic languages while French is a Romance language

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tani17
tani17
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 1470

Actually, the problem is that English is a mash up of Germanic and French. The Danes ruled most of the country for several hundred years and then William the conqueror brought in his cronies and the nobles spoke French for centuries until they finally merged about the time of Henry VIII

4 years ago
Learn Danish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.