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"The child takes a pair of jeans."

Translation:L'enfant prend un jean.

4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ThierryUwi

Are there words in French that use plural. Here, for example, I was tempted to use "des jeans"...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myfunnyvalentine

"jean" is always singular : "un jean", or sometimes "un jeans". But you would say "une paire de jeans", since "une paire" is always followed by a plural. Some words are always plural though, such as "des pantalons"("trousers").

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThierryUwi

Merci! Donc l'expression 'une paire de jeans' est passable en Francais? I badly want to get back my ability to fluidly write French.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myfunnyvalentine

In France, people are more likely to say "un jean" or "un jeans", while in Quebec they are more likely to say "une paire de jeans". Both versions are grammatically correct, the only difference is regional.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Namaat

I must disagree with "des pantalons", though. I say pantalon if I'm speaking about one pair, and I don't think it's a regional thing since Wikip├ędia use the singular without problem. Singular is totally fine. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantalon

Using plural for one item of clothing sounds very "ancient French" to me, when it was custom to refer to "lower body" pieces of clothing exclusively with plural (jupons, froques, braies, ...), I guess it depends on the background, but I'll say un jeans, un short, un pantalon, etc. speaking of one item (I know these three at least can be singular or plural even when speaking about only one piece of them).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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I also have to disagree on the use of "un jeans" which is not correct: "un jean", "des jeans"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myfunnyvalentine

I beg to differ : "un jeans" is the original writing, and correct. "jean", singular, is the fabric, and by metonymy we now also say "un jean".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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That is not what I found in my Larousse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BelAir16490

I don't understand why translating "a pair" (une paire" is wrong, when that is what is asked for!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyrusButler

I said paire des jeans, which should be accepted, yet it was wrong, because i said pair of jeans, not just jeans

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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We do not count pants in pairs (slacks, trousers, pyjamas...) but in single units: un pantalon, un jean, un pyjama.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyrusButler

are you from france, because if not do not use the word we, because that would suggest you are a french person

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Yes, I am French.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary76459

What is the difference between "Prendre", i.e., "take, make, get," and ""Tenir," i.e., "take, hold, keep"? I wrote "L'enfant tient un jean," and it was marked incorrect because of the verb "Tenir." Merci!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Once you have "taken" something, you "hold" it.

Prendre = to take/grab (from the shelf to your hand): there is a movement

Tenir = to hold (in your hand): this is static

There are other meanings but those are the basic, respective meanings of "prendre" and "tenir".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary76459

Ah, merci! And then there is the other verb, "saisir," "to seize," which is used in these exercises to mean "grab!"

1 month ago