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"The children are good students."

Translation:Los niños son buenos estudiantes.

5 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Spanish adjectives go after the noun they modify... except when they don't. (sigh)

The good news is that when they go before the noun, it usually has a different meaning. So it will be easy to know where to place it. (in theory)

I like the explanation that Mr. Erichsen gives at aboutspanish: http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/adjective_placement.htm

For bueno specifically, i like this thread: http://forums.tomisimo.org/showthread.php?t=790

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luksurious

So basically in this context, estudiantes buenos would rather refer to students which do good things in general (~ jedis) as opposed to students which perform well in school?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowlandPhilomath

Exactly what I don't understand in this situation.

Whenever you perform well in school it seems that you're fairly objectively a good student. In which case it would seem placing buenos at the end of the sentence should be correct as well (as we don't have any further context).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

I agree with lowland. What on the English sentence indicates that they aren't referring to students who perform well in school.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninnies

so the location of buenos is absolutely wrong? los niños son estudiantes buenos.

or is it just the buenos that's wrong? and it should have been buenas? thanks

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shafica

From one of the links that Miss Spell posted: When placed after a noun, the adjective tends to add a somewhat objective meaning, while placed before it often provides an emotional or subjective meaning. (tengo un viejo amigo typically means "I have a longtime friend," and tengo un amigo viejo typically means "I have an elderly friend." )

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickBai1

Cool, thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanSchmidt1

Blerg. Won't accept hijos for children

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

It might have accepted the feminine "hijas." Hijos are sons or a family's children with at least one son. Also, notice how buenas (which is modifying the gender neutral "estudiantes") is feminine? That's another clue that you are talking about girls.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

No. Neither hijos or hijas mean "children".

Duo will allow the sentence to be said in the masculine or feminine. But, whichever you choose to use, you must follow through in the whole sentence. Both "Los niños son buenos estudiantes." and "Las niñas son buenas estudiantes." are correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Oddly, my Talking Multi-language Translation and Dictionary app, which normally lists an astonishingly large string of meanings for words I look up just shows one word for niños: offspring. It left out, "sons," which is odd. Personally, I think "children" is an acceptable translation of niños where it is clear that it is one's own offspring that is being talked about, and not, say, the children in the street or on the playground. If such clarity of parentage is not present, "children," then has to be wrong in any sentence as an English meaning for niños.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

Niños/niñas are the Spanish generic words for children; we don't necessarily know whose children they are, without context. "Veo cinco niños," can mean either, "I see 5 children," or, "I see 5 boys." They may be 5 boys or a combination of 5 boys and girls; we don't know without additional context. "Las niñas están juegan," means "The girls (children) are playing"; it cannot mean male children. If you say, "Mis hijos," your are either saying, "My sons" or "My children (which could be a combination of sons and daughters)" and without context, we do not know which is intended. If you say, "Mis hijas" you are saying, "My daughters." I hope this explains my post, below, better. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Note, I have seen Duoling assign, niños, to mean, children. It could have been an errir, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

Niño - boy; niña - girl; hijo - son; hija - daughter. Plurals are just a bit more complicated. See next post.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

Hijos/hijas = sons/daughters Niños/niñas = children (either all boys or a mixed group) / female children

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

It should be pointed out that the question is masculine but the translation on this link is feminine gender. I responded to JanSchmidt1 after looking at the top of this form. By the way, now I know where the new pronunciation guide is located. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Can you provide a clue as to where the new pronounciation guide might be? I didn't even know there was an old one

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patricia.s156

Can I vent? Good. I took Spanish for three years in high school, one semester of college, took a 9-CD "learn Spanish in your car" course. Adjectives go after the noun. Not once did any of the teachers I had, including two native speakers, one of whom lived in Spain for three years, say that "sometimes the adjective goes before the noun. Not once. I don't know who I'm annoyed at. But this is annoying.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth2
DanRoth2
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Why does this need to be "alumnos" instead of "estudiantes?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

I don't follow. The translation duo gives is

Translation: Las niñas son buenas estudiantes.

Could you have had another error?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth2
DanRoth2
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I wish I had taken a screenshot. I did have "buenos" in the wrong spot, but the translation Duo gave me used "alumnos"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidAukerman

Me too. My guess is that Duo saw us put "buenos" at the end of the sentence and said, "a word ending in -nos, well, that's close. alumnos would have been correct."

4 years ago