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  5. "A mulher tem uma capa."

"A mulher tem uma capa."

Translation:The woman has a cape.

June 18, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tetsuo-ka

Is she a super hero? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0z0

she sounds pretty super!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnrFuta

Wonderwoman doesn't have a cape, but maybe I'm just taking it too seriously lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayO_Jag

But Supergirl does!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5VETLANA

Which definition is most popular/most commonly used in everyday conversation? Cape, Cloak, or Cover? Could the word also mean "Coat" or no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Cape • no arm sleeves, hip-thigh length

Cloak • knee length or longer

Coat • varying: short, mid, long, heavy, light, hoodless, hooded

Cover • general term for any covering; cap, hat, hood, coat, cape, cloak, jacket, poncho, leggings & etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrisBlack1

Well.... most women are super heroes ya know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingoHepCat

In Florida, I have only ever seen someone wear a cape to dress up as a superhero. However, since that is rather weird, I doubt that that is what is meant here. Is "uma capa" more like a winter cloak, or is it actually just a frivolous piece of fabric wafting at your back to make you look like Batman or Superman? I seem to recall that in Tess of the D'Ubervilles, she wore a cape, and so I am thinking a cape may be a form of winter clothing of which would be unfamiliar to me as a Floridian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

Well, depending on your age, you might be interested to know that Porto in Portugal helped set the stage for Harry Potter and that included the Hogwart's school uniforms with their capes. In Portugal the university students are colloquially referred to as morcegos or bats (so kind of Batman-ish).

https://louiseandrobertacruiseportugal.wordpress.com/2016/10/09/hogwarts-capes-in-portugal/

This is a Tuna Group (most have their capes over their shoulders because they are so warm, which is welcome in the cold Portuguese winter where most houses are unheated – the patches are earned somehow, and the capes are purposely torn to signify a romantic relationship while in university... so that some have several tears by graduation, that are then sewn up again):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuna_(music)

You can listen to some of the girls here (some whom are wearing their capes):

https://youtu.be/_mXbhN0Or3Q

Boys:

https://youtu.be/EVaNfEfI6tE

And a mixed group (most have their capes in front of them cause capes have many duties including holding things down in the wind):

https://youtu.be/7oCYn2I385I

But there is a fashion here too for the cape-like coats such as these:

So many more designs! All cape-ish.

Even the boys:


As a bonus, here is the bookstore that inspired many of the Harry Potter sets:

https://www.businessinsider.com/porto-portugal-livraria-lello-bookstore-harry-potter-jk-rowling-2018-8


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hayyay2415

Weird Ashley from the middle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sibi254

Does a cape also mean a hat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No, it doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rich.Smith

Do people in Brazil actually wear capes? Is that a fashion there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No. This is just a random sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

Isn't "capa" more than just "cape"?

Brazil is also a big place and people in different regions wear different things, not just say different words. =]

Someone here on Duo taught me that...


But Portuguese is also not just Brazil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/o_scott

quando fui para Coimbra, encontrei umas estudantes de direito. elas estavam vestindo pretas capas de la mesmo em clima quente. nao para moda, por distincao.

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