1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Taitníonn an scéal leo."

"Taitníonn an scéal leo."

Translation:They enjoy the story.

October 17, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/O_Fallon

ugh, I answered "The story shines with them" I didn't know that "to shine" could be translated to ... "to enjoy". I need to start thinking like an Appalachian person or Ozark Mountain person ... "taking a shine" with or to something or usually someone, used to mean "like" as in .... oh! He's taken a shine to her! (he really has grown to like her a lot).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It only means “enjoy” when the preposition le is involved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseBarry2

I am irish and i did'nt know it ment enjoy eidher


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanGLEJohnENG

Even in English, we say this, "he took a shine to it" meaning he liked/enjoys "it". It's not the most common phrase but it's not rare either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Labhras88

If I wanted to say "They enjoy the story with us", would "Taitníonn an scéal leo linn" be grammatically correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattyG7

I would just like to point out that I had never seen this phrase before strengthening my skills. I couldn't be expected to know the idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueWillow991967

Yeah, but it's not like it's a test. Encountering unfamiliar idioms gracefully is part of the whole second language experience.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

The tooltip translates "taitníonn" as "shines". Is this idiomatic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Taitin translates as " shine" literally, yes. To say someone likes something, you have to have taitin with le...Basically, "___ shines with them". So, yes, it's idiomatic, and it's also how you express "liked" and " will like"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

Thanks again! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemonovanii

Could 'Taitníonn siad an scéal' be an alternative way of saying this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No — that would mean “They shine the story” (and not “shine” as “polish”). A form of le is necessary for the “enjoy” meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemonovanii

Oh that's right! Go raibh a mile maith agat :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Finnvardr

Lol I answered it correctly in irish and it told me I typed in english so I tried it again 5 times and says I answered in english so I answered in english and got the same message. Had to intentionally get it wrong to get past it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Take a screenshot, submit a bug report.

Post your screenshot in the Troubleshooting discussions too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1dunmore

Could you say taitníonn siad an scéal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

No, as explained in the earlier comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeMalone372235

Why not "The story pleases them."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

If you get this exercise again, enter "The story pleases them" again, and then report "My answer should be accepted" if it isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roisin102564

Can you say "the story agrees with them"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaKalai6

Can one say 'is maith leo an sceal'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abbylands

What does "leo" mean in the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sliotar.

taitníonn (rud) le (duine) means "((a)thing) pleases ((a) person)", which is often rendered as ((a) person) likes ((a) thing)".

leo is the 3rd person plural form of le, it is the equivalent of (person) being "them" - "((a)thing) pleases (them)", which, due to the vagaries of English, becomes "(they) like ((a) thing)".

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.