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  5. "Fino a dove?"

"Fino a dove?"

Translation:Up to where?

June 18, 2013

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbbindle

What does this sentence mean? I don't understand the English translation, or how one would use it in Italian...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilboburgler

Until where, means nothing to me either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbbindle

OK, let me make a stab at this. In English, I might say "Up to where?" if I was asking someone how much he or she wanted, as in how much water should I pour in to your glass, or how high do you want me to build this wall? Technically, it isn't a correct sentence because it has no verb, but you might hear this spoken aloud. For you Italian speakers, am I in the right ballpark here? Is this what it would mean in Italian, also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilboburgler

Or is it a geographical thing. Keep going until you reach the river, "Until where?" the river. etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

Yeah, that's perfectly plausible.

What I don't understand is why the extra 'a' is there. For until where/up to where I would just have tried "Fino dove" since the additional 'to' seems redundant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilboburgler

Maybe "fino a" means "until" while "fino" means "till".

I see the phrase now means "up to where"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angvin

Why isn't "As far as where?" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biochemistry

That would be "Fin dove?" instead of "Fino a dove?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tango-alpha

I agree, since it's one of the given translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lflinares

How about "Where to?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biochemistry

That would just be "A dove?" instead of "Fino a dove?"

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