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"You are perfectly capable."

Translation:Eres perfectamente capaz.

0
5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Supergym
Supergym
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I put "Eres capaz perfectamente", and it gives wrong. Does the order of adverb really matters?

36
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RadMatt01

I did the same thing. I would have thought the adverb meaning would be the same whether in front of or immediately after the descriptor.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robynlenore

Is there ever a situation where this sentence would make sense using estar instead -- estás perfectamente capaz?

15
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eualb
Eualb
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Estás perfectamente CAPACITADO (trained)

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/420casul

"Son, I think I'm gettin old. I should stop playing football with you". "Dad, you're perfectly capable of playing (now at this moment, he might no be 10 years from now)!"

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HawaQuisia

WTF

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
E.T.s_Son
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I have the same question?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neontzars
neontzars
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That's what I wrote - in many contexts I think it would make sense (if one is taking contingencies into account) . Off the top of my head, an example in English: "I know you don't feel well today, but nevertheless, you are perfectly capable of washing the dishes."

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Would you ever use estar with capaz or would it only be used with ser? (Some other people have asked about this too).

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VaneAbarca1

Ser capaz Estar capacitado

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thank you!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurajt07

Is competente an accurate translation for capable as well?

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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I tried it because it was offered in the mouse-over "peek", but it wasn't accepted.

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aryahmmr
aryahmmr
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Why not "Tu es perfectamente capaz"? I put this and gift it wrong.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lasirk
lasirk
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Because it would be "tú eres".Es is used with he/she/it.

9
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

Eres is the form of the verb that matched tu

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CiertoAmor2001

Me too!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milrecan
milrecan
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Why not "Son perfectamente capaz" as in You all are perfectly capable

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neontzars
neontzars
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You have to pluralize "capaz" to agree with the third-person plural pronoun : "Son perfectamente capaces." (Note, NOT "capazes," the "z" becomes unvoiced in this and similar constructions (i.e., you use an "s" sound, think "fuzz" versus "fuss," though this is actually a much trickier matter in English than it is in Spanish). Contrary to what's said below, you don't "need" the ustedes since pronouns are mostly used for clarity and emphasis. But duolingo doesn't put anything in context, which is sort of annoying since English speakers tend to gratuitously overuse pronouns while speaking Spanish.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fiatal

Need the ustedes with son, i think

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reedm02

Why not eres son perfectamente capaz?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Only ustedes/ellos/ellas with son. Besides, eres and son are both conjugations of the ser verb. You can't have that. :)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

reedm- because you have the verb eres, sing. and the verb son, plural, for the same sentence.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

milrecan- son is also for they, so the sentence is about you, you must mention ustedes

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milrecan
milrecan
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A lot of the sentences we have used leave off the pronoun. why not here? you pick it up from the context.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

milrecan. Yes you omit the pronoun when there's no confusion. If you write : son people could think that you mean ellos/they. As they and ustedes have the same conjugation, you have to specify.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlockheadGrande

Why not "Tú eres capaz perfectamente"? Can't the adverb go after the adjective? And it's not the tú, because duolingo usually tells me when I don't put in the pronoun to remind me that using the pronoun is perfectly acceptable.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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The adverb usually goes directly after the verb in my experience.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

I have noticed just the opposite. It seems that if the advdrb modifies the verb it goes before the verb.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asperganoid
Asperganoid
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eres capaz, soy capaz, somos todos capaz?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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FALSO AMIGO: don't be tempted thinking capable is the same en español.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neontzars
neontzars
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Could you elaborate? The word is English is a bit more supple, it seems? Are you saying that the Spanish sense implies a permanent attribute - like, say, skill (I mean to say, if you are a world-class athlete and have a bad day for some reason, no one will say you're all of a sudden unskilled, you'd still be perfectly skilled)? I was thinking more along the lines of using ser/estar when talking about someone's appearance (e.g., you can be handsome/pretty in general and still look terrible when you have the flu)

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

I believe Talca was referring to the fact that the list of English cognates (words that convert from English to Spanish with almost no change of either spelling or meaning) is over 1,000 words long. Most of the -ible or -able words are included in this list. E.g., possible-->posible. But capable is a "false friend" in this regard. Instead, the Spanish is "capaz," not "capable."

The other issue you bring up has to do with which form of "to be" you employ. "Ser" should be used when the objects essential character or trait is being spoken of. E.g., Ella es bonita. El maestro es listo. Mi hija es dulce. "Estar" (from which we get words like "state," as in "Estados Unidos") should be used for temporary states. E.g., Ella esta en la casa. El esta cansado. Mi madre esta en españa.

Where it gets tricky depends on what we are trying to say. If I want to imply that my priest is a happy person, and not just that he's happy at the moment, I'd say, Mi sacerdote es feliz.

The other tricky thing is that in a few cases, Spanish views things as states that we might intuitively view as permanent characteristics. E.g., El abogado esta muerto. The lawyer is dead. Sounds pretty permanent, right? But in Spanish, for whatever reason, death is portrayed in the language as a temporary state.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neontzars
neontzars
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Oh, you're right, I missed that point. (By the way, to everyone else, I recommend making flash cards of false cognates especially if your vocabulary is still embryonic: http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/111). I hadn't really thought of your last point - I would never say "es muerto" but only because I've never heard or read it and it just "sounds wrong." If I had to explain, I'd say it's because we don't think of death as being a defining/essential personal attribute ("Socrates es mortal," sure, but "es muerte"? So is everyone else from antiquity)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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FALSOS AMIGOS: actual does not = actual (meaning = present time). agenda does not = agenda (meaning = diary) decepción does not = deception (meaning = disappointed) ... Cuidado ¡Hay mucho!

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El_Mercielago

I'm going to stop mixing up Eres (you are) and Estas (are you) one of these days.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/menorman
menorman
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Sos?

1
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashley.BTS

Eres perfectamente capable. Wow~ didnt know that i was wrong being a hispanic person, speaks spanish 18 hours a day, have spanish for natives class, little girl, laugh my ass off, im going to be a contributer i dont give a damn i have homework im changing this answer yeet

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzdragon022

I also put competent (I don't think I came across capaz in my lessons somehow) but it was marked wrong. I think because "capable" means you have the ability to do something, but "competent" means you have the knowledge to know how to do it. For example, you might be capable of being a doctor but you aren't competent in medicine.

Though why they're both in one word is beyond me.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertdforrest

My "tu eres perfectamente competente" was quashed... por que?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

robert- competente is competent in English. Capaz is capable

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

Besides, tu requiring an accent which DL doesn't mark wrong it looks ok but DL say it should b capaz for capable.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/felixcfc__

I wrote down "Estás perfectamente capaz." but it is suddenly not accepted. Please explain why this is so. Gracias :)

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

See explanations above. Use eres for a more permanent state of to be. Estas is less permanent. Donde estas? Cor the time being, estoy aqui.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArunRamach2

Ellos son perfectamente capaz. Why is that wrong?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

Ellos is the 3rd person plural pronoun. "They."

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neontzars
neontzars
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Two points: 1: Ellos is third person, not second person, so you're saying "they are..." ; 2: If you did want to use something other than the tú form here (but in this context it must be second-person as noted above), you would have to alter the singular "capaz" for number: "Ustedes/vosotros son perfectamente CAPACES" would be acceptable. (Caps just for emphasis, of course!)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

I wrote "usted son perfectamente capaces", thinking that because usted goes with "son" that the adjective should be plural - but this was corrected to "ustedes". Would "usted son perfectamente capaz" be ok?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fiatal

No, because 'son' is plural and must be matched with 'ustedes,' which is also plural. You could say "usted es perfectamente capaz" or "ustedes son perfectamente capaces" if you want to use the 'usted' form.

0
Reply2 years ago