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"Céard atá ar siúl?"

Translation:What is going on?

3 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/4meerschweinchen
4meerschweinchen
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this is how irish grammar makes me feel

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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and spelling, and pronunciation, and speaking...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ichigotchi
Ichigotchi
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There's a system to the pronunciation. It actually makes more sense than English spelling once you learn the rules. Search for Karen reshkin's video on YouTube. She has a prinout too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cael55
Cael55
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You are correct. Here is the link to Karen's YouTube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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And I say, hey hey hey hey I said hey, what's going on?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

I wake in the morning, and I step outside, I take a deep breath, and I get real high, and I scream at the top of my lungs: What's going on?! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liaagatha

I just give a lingo because of this comment

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheCassifier

This is exactly what I thought of.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celt2
Celt2
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Why do they use the word for walk in this sentence? I find this a bit confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's an idiomatic phrase. The literal one is "What is it that is on walking"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celt2
Celt2
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You're my hero! You answer all my questions :) Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciaratiara

since it is saying "on walking" would it not work to say "on going" or the verb form of "théa?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No. It's just the idiom that uses "walking", and it wouldn't mean the same with a different verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

English has/had a similar idiom "afoot"? You will still occasionally come across the phrase "something was afoot", and according to IMDB, there was even a short film made in 1966 entitled "What's Afoot?" (about the British carpet industry!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warder9
Warder9
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Old Norse has the same dual meaning of walking and going (gengr). I imagine several modern Germanic tongues still do. Doppleganger comes to mind.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yoavginsburg

when do you use ta' and when do you use ata'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

atá is used with the direct relative clause.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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And in questions, I guess?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Generally you use a relative clause in questions. Whether it's a direct relative clause or an indirect one, which uses bhfuil, depends on the question itself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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This makes me feel a little confused. Could you please clarify what direct and indirect relative clause are? Sorry, I usually don't have problems with grammar, but I'm not a native English-speaker so I may be unfamiliar with the terminology, and the lack of examples doesn't help me much...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

They're just different types of relative clauses. Indirect ones generally involve a pronoun, where as direct ones don't. Sorry; I'm not good at explaining these things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreGardner21

If i learn one sentence, it is this one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J-Rey

I took it as meaning something like... What's afoot? Which is kind of an old fashioned way of asking... What's going on/happening?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gliddon

Wassup?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dangantitan

Well, the fox is talking, Paul is in the fridge with his wife (and some peaches and candies), and everyone loves TFIOS.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pcpmn
pcpmn
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"Cad" pronounced cod, is another word for what

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

I don't believe I have come across ar siúl before this question, but it wasn't marked as new content. Was quite confusing for awhile whilst trying to remember it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarjava

Same here. I just read the discussion when this happens, and more often than not, someone explained it's an idiom, and thus, we just need to know (we did learn ar and siúl separately, just not together as an expression). I like this way of learning on duolingo to be honest :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JrgenZirak
JrgenZirak
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Just as a side note - I find it interesting that the metaphor of going/walking plus a preposition is common for an unknown activity in several languages - English, Irish, German ("Was geht da vor" literally "what is going ahead there") French? ("Qu'est-ce qui se passe" my French is not a lot better than my Irish currently, but it looks to me there is "passer" = "pass, go by" in there somehow)... Maybe a generalization from "who goes there" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JrgenZirak
JrgenZirak
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Is "what goes on" just "not so good" english or really wrong? (It's in the lyrics of a Beatles song, for instance - though does not make it necessarily good english... and it's actually "what goes on in your mind" there)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"What goes on" uses the habitual present, "what is going on" uses the progressive present. In both English and Irish these are two different things, and they are not generally interchangeable.

"I wonder what goes on in there?" suggests that there are things happening "in there" on a regular basis, "I wonder what is going on in there" refers to the current activity happening "in there".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mloci

Can I say "Cad a ar siúl?" instead?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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So my question would be is this how people today actually say "What is going on?" in Irish. I mean is is used a lot? Or is there another way of saying "What is going on?" that is used more because "What is afoot?" isn't exactly used in English anymore and I wondered if it was the same for Irish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Yes, Cad/Céard atá ar siúl? is exactly how people say "what's happening?" or "what's going on?" today. It's not the only way to say that, but it is a common and current usage.

The only connection with "afoot" is that you use your feet to siúl, indicating that, even in English, the concept of using the word siúl for this idiom isn't all that strange.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicForster1

Clearly "what is afoot?" Is the best translation

1 month ago