"Et barn"

Translation:A child

October 18, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhursttn

Simply as an aid to anyone who might have trouble remembering that "barn" means "child", note the (somewhat) archaic English word and Lallans Scots word "bairn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

Actually, "bairn" for child, is still quite common in the north of England, Scotland and Ireland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meowool

Yeah I noticed that as well! Although that was when i was doing a norwegian thing, but the two languages are v. similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yogin12

Scandinavian languages sound more or less the same. In Swedish too, the word for child is barn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillem91

So... "r" is not pronounced? Or is it so soft that I just didn't hear it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod

    After a vowel, Rs tend to be more like a modifier for the vowel (hear the difference between and sår by clicking on the little speaker icon next to the "Udtale" part) generally making the vowel a little longer or more rounded I guess


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nucleonide

    So the "a" by itself sounds like the English short "e", (So, "ban" would sound like "ben") then the "ar" sounds like a longer English short "a" (so, "barn" would be "baan"). Is this correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
    Mod

      Not always, as with many languages, some letters have many pronunciations (Listen here to the pronunciation of the Danish word "banan" (banana), both the "a"s are pronounced differently) but generally, yes, with an r, it's more like the English "ar" sound


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

      The r can be said to represent the stød here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rashtrakut

      When do you use et and when do you use en?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nucleonide

      There are just certain words that go with "et" (e.g., "barn") or "en" (e.g., "kvinde"). I don't know if there's a pattern, so we might just have to remember and memorize. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indra927477

      That is true-one just has to learn them. ~75% of substantives go with "en"- normally people and animals. But there are exeptions,too.Like "et barn", "et lam".:-) Held og lykke!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandonauto

      One Child... or just a child nobody actually cares what what you answer is lol


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariatimida

      When I was learning Danish with another system, it taught me that børn meant child. Did I learn it wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
      Mod

        There could have been a misunderstanding. "A child" is "et barn", but "children" is "børn"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllaFradki

        Can it also be 'barnet' ?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
        Mod

          "Barnet" = "The child"
          "Et barn" = "A child"


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Micheled123

          it says ''a barn''.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr-Chakra

          Et barn - same in Swedish and Norwegian.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jrbrobsrv

          How do I say kid in Danish?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0908mimi

          I heard the sound its va arn


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vilhelm210017

          How do i identify when to use "et" instead of "en"? I keep on getting the answers technically right but it always points out a typo when i type "en" every time even though it wants "et". Is there an actual difference or are they interchangeable?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

          I get "bah'n" from this, with a distinct glottal stop between the r and the n, or perhaps an epenthetic schwa as in Irish bol'g, bor'b. Or something close to how a Scot might pronounce the farm outbuilding "bar'n".

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