https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziggKogg

"Arriviamo a casa alle diciotto."

June 19, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toddsjordan

It's 24 hour clock.... 6am is sei, 6pm is diciotto because in 24 hour clock it's written as 18:00.

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quazar

OMG I am ashamed I didn't connect that. but isn't that pronounced eighteen hundred?

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toddsjordan

I've not heard it pronounced that way yet, but I could well be, I'm not an expert!

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziggKogg

diciotto means both 6pm and 18?

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quazar

I know, that's messed up right.

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ackworth

Surely pm is better than six in the evening!

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterC93

It's not that messed up guys! "diciotto" only means 6 when referring to time, in the same way that some people would say eighteen hundred hours to say 6 pm.

When talking about numbers rather than time, 'diciotto' is just 18 !

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quazar

But it is messed up cause military time they don't say 18, that makes no sense. They say 1800, so no it doesn't make sense at all.

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterC93

OK , I'm used to 24 hour clock so it's not a huge problem for me to see '18' and think 6 pm

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quazar

Ok well you aren't used to a correct military clock then. If I said meet me at 18, you would have no clue what I meant. but if I said meet me at 1800 you would know. No one say I leave at 21, they say 2100.

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterC93

Well I am familiar with a military clock how ever it wouldn't be common in English to say "let's meet at 1800 hours" anyway.. As in English we would just say see you at 6 and the assumption is made depending on the time in the day really even without saying '6 in the evening' . In Italian how ever, they are more familiar with a 24 hour clock, hence the use of 'diciotto'

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quazar

Dude I am American and it's very common to say 1800, I have never heard anyone say 18.

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterC93

oh right, in London no one would say 1800. With that in mind no one would say 18 either, I'm more referring to when writing, if someone said in Italian , let's meet at 18 I would hear it in a different context I suppose, like not translating literally just getting the context from it

July 10, 2013
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