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  5. "Quem quer um copo?"

"Quem quer um copo?"

Translation:Who wants a cup?

October 20, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

I thought cup was xícara.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoGa503068

"Copo" is a simple cylindrical drinking utensil, which can be made of glass, paper, plastic, metal, where we serve most beverages.

"Xícara" has a handle and is usually small and bowl shaped, used for tea and coffee

"Caneca" is pretty much a Copo with a handle. Usually used for hot beverages and associated with the English word "mug"

"Taça" is what you drink wine from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

Very nicely explained. I would, however, add that I would translate both copo and taça as glass if made from glass. Taça could also translate as goblet if it is, like a goblin, small and, like a taça do copo do mundo when it's ornate..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Normally yes.

Xícara always has handles (I don't know if that is how they call it). If there is no handle, it's not a xícara.

So, some cups are not xícaras, because they got no handles. These are called "copo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

I guess that's the same In English (handles is perfect)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G_6

So if i refer to a cup with handles as copo. Am i being incorrect or just informal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amcross1

I thought copo might be like copa in Spanish in that it could be slang for a drink. Is this not the case in Portuguese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littlemylittlemy

I thought so too, but perhaps it requires the verb tomar (tomar um copo)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lars394191

Why not "who would like a cup"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

Would like is 'gostaria'

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