1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Danish
  4. >
  5. "I am an excellent wife to hi…

"I am an excellent wife to him."

Translation:Jeg er ham en fremragende kone.

October 20, 2014

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akurzias

I think a good way to think of this sentence for english speakers is to translate the phrase as: "I am, to him, an excellent wife"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa79533

So til is not needed in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolanterne

very often, til is not actually the translation for the word "for". if you hover over this one, the top suggestion for the word "for" is actually "for", with the others being "med" and "om". quite often (and more often than not), "for" in danish is the correct translation for the word "for" in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaelPaiv9

Is it like the dative objects in german? I mean? It is "ham" already woyld mean "to him" in the sentence "Jeg er ham..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa79533

Yes I understand the configuration. Often in Italian you must think like this, but this still does not answer the question as to why there is no word for “to him” used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ozymandias0

Why does the above translation work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rich524475

In translation into English, why is "jeg er en frenragende kone til ham" a wrong translation? Can "til" be used in this statement or is it always wrong and why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathyKarch

I want to know the answer to this question as well, so I am grabbing it and posting it on a different thread. If I get a good explanation, I will post it here for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alsmith

Where's the "to" or why is it not needed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rammile

I don't get it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathyKarch

This is literally the first time I have seen this grammatical arrangement appear in this program. Also, I read all the "tips" sheets prior to starting a new skill, and I have yet to encounter a discussion of this structural arrangement in the Danish language. I feel as if this is being sprung upon us without any kind of introduction or explanation, and it seems to be important enough to merit one.

Learn Danish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.