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"Jeg har prøvet at skære brødet for dig."

Translation:I have tried to cut the bread for you.

4 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
Bluthund
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When do you say "for dig" and when "til dig"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cipnicodk

''for dig'' when you should do it, but somebody else is doing it

''til dig'' when is a present, gift

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheInfiniteFish
TheInfiniteFish
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Noticed that the Danish for 'try' is 'prøve' and the Italian is 'provare' - is there a link somewhere, I wonder...?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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Possibly. Danish gets "prøve" from the Low German word "prove" which, in turn, comes from the Latin word "proba".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvindy
tvindy
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Also, in Portuguese it is "provar," and in Esperanto it is "provi."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffous

In this module we "tried" is sometime 'prøvet' and sometimes 'prøvede'. Can anyone explain the rule for determining which is correct in a sentence?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffous

Ah, I found the answer: the simple past tense is prøvede, but all perfect forms are prøvet. Jeg prøvede at lære dansk - I tried to learn Danish [and then stopped] Jeg har prøvet at lærne dansk - I have tried to learn Danish [and am still trying]

So a simple rule would be: if there is a har, havde, or have in front: it's "prøvet", otherwise: "prøvede".

Full conjugation map here: http://www.verbix.com/webverbix/go.php?D1=26&T1=pr%C3%B8ve&H1=126

5 months ago