"Doshiblín."

Translation:Your sibling.

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EavanM

I spy Béarlachas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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'Siblín'? I've never encountered this monstrosity before.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Alas, it's what foocail.ie has for it...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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There's an awful lot of drivel on focal.ie.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnJoeJack

Feckall.ie, amiright?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

what oddity is this? i have lived in gaeltacht conamara all my life and geallaim dhuit, no one i have ever spoken to has ever used this word. ever. Tis almost as bad as Vardrús or Vallet

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pcpmn
pcpmn
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You'd never hear this. Surely "my brothers and sisters" would be better

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikemilg
Mikemilg
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"focloir.ie" give "siblín" -but then doesn't use it in any of the examples! http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/sibling?q=sibling

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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It's a non-word. Invented in an office sometime in the last couple of decades or so.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

should we report it as unnatural?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morrman
morrman
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Report this as unnatural

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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Could somebody tell me please whether the accent on the i means that the syllable is stressed, or does it only change the quality of the i from a short i to a long i? In other words, is it pronounced "hibleen" or "hiblEEn"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It makes the vowel long. In Munster Irish, it would also shift the stress to that syllable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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Thank you! You're helping me a lot, and it's much appreciated. (I wasn't sure if the accent was used like in Spanish, which I know much better.) Thanks also for explaining about the Munster version; as far as I can gather my Irish ancestors were from Limerick so I think they may have spoken most similarly to that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayfking
jayfking
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It's a word. Béarlachas it may seem, but tell me another Irish word for a someone else with the same parents that doesn't refer to their gender? All the more necessary to have for people who aren't male or female.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

There is no gender neutral word in Irish; hence this one was invented. Nothing wrong with creating new terms---that's part of what Foras na Gaeilge is for---but when we need to do so, better do it using the existing rich and varied Irish lexicon. What about 'mo chuid fola'? Too street?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Using fuil as a singular countable noun for “sibling” would make “my sibling” m’fhuil. I think that fuil would be too street for me, but I’m old enough that lots of things are too street for me. ;*)

If we’re taking it upon ourselves to coin a replacement for siblín, I’ll suggest comhbhroinn (feminine, second declension; genitive singular comhbhroinne, strong plural comhbhroinnte), as a calque of Ancient Greek ἀδελφός (would this seanghréagachas be a lesser sin than a béarlachas ?). Comhbhroinn is a compound word, so look up its constituent parts in the FGB to find its literal meaning. I suppose that comhbhroinneach could be an analogous adjective (masculine genitive singular comhbhroinnigh, feminine genitive singular comhbhroinní, strong plural comhbhrionneacha), akin to “siblingly”, e.g. Is í Philadelphia an chathair grá chomhbhroinnigh.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/B-mhongoadh

lol, I think I've ever used 'sibling' in English, or heard anyone else, off the t.v. , use it. (But I would be up for any of the suggestions above)

2 years ago
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