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  5. "Lo voy a cubrir."

"Lo voy a cubrir."

Translation:I am going to cover it.

June 20, 2013

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

Does this also mean: I will pay (the check)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babella

I do not know if in some places that is what it means, but the first thing that comes to my mind when I read "lo voy a cubrir" es that you will cover something (or someone) with a blanket or something of the like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rlhwilson

I could see that this could be a slang for "covering the check"... but you are always safe with the literal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kit262

How common is it to say "voy a cubrirlo" vs. "lo voy a cubrir"? I am used to writing the former (Spanish class ages ago), but Duo seems to prefer the latter. Just curious what native speakers are more likely to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alvares_21

"lo voy a cubrir". voy a cubrirlo is more formal or literary, although it can also be used orally sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Higgs_Boson

and how about the feminine form.. Would you say 'la voy a cubrir' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--shaun--

Yep. "la voy a cubrir" and "voy a cubrirla" are both acceptable for a feminine 'it'. I don't think it really matters which one you use - although it seems to me that the former is used more often (at least when it is written down).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unchary

yes, la if it's something like "la herida" (the injury) but lo if its something like "el cuerpo" (the body)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/casalily

'Voy a cubrirlo' seems to be perfectly acceptable in Spain, where I live. I had assumed the alternative version to be the South American form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoyDrae

One way to check more common usage is to google both. I did. "lo voy a cubrir" got 85,000+ hits while "voy a cubrirlo" got 16,000 hits. Remember you have to google the phrases in quotes to get a comparative count.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alvares_21

Does this also have a jornalistic meaning? You know, like a jornalist would say "I'll cover that news story".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parseltongue

Does it sound like she is saying Lo voy a cu-brish to anybody else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeremyjohnc

it does sound like an -ge or -sh at the end..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pissedoff3

I didnt even hear that ...I heard Coh...(not coo) .. biff


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/randelrocks

She sounded "coobresh"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael861235

Impossible to translate with the robot voice saying coobrish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/espeekespanish

Someone native, please confirm: can this phrase be used for its other non-literal english meanings: "I am going to cover the check"; "I'm going to cover this news story"; basically, is this synonymous to "I am going to take care of it"? Muchas gracias!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jfGor

espeekespanish,

SpanishDict gives lots of excamples. I did not specifically see to cover as in cover a check http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/cover

The SpanishEict gives this example: 9. (to commentate on) a. cubrir He covered the war in Afghanistan for the New York Times.Cubrió la guerra en Afganistán para el New York Times.

Babella from Spain native speaker says above:

"I do not know if in some places that is what it means, but the first thing that comes to my mind when I read "lo voy a cubrir" es that you will cover something (or someone) with a blanket or something of the like."

So far that is the only native speaker that I see.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickerz_snickerz

Should "I am going to take cover" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

I'm pretty sure that'd be the reflexive (cubrirse), as in " Me voy a cubrir."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoneystone

Could this also be "I am going to meet him"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babella

No, the use of "meet" that "cubrir" is synonym of is the one that means you have reached a quota: I have met the sales quota = He cubierto el cupo de ventas.

A little tip: most of the times stay with the first or two first options, the rest are usually quite specific and you will not be using them that much; you can get to them later ;]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohantasourajit

Voy a cubrirlo sounds good


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pissedoff3

Future tense...cubriré....Present tense ...lo voy a cubrir...and she doesn't say either...She says Covifff..???.. speak properly please I'm trying to learn...x x x x x x x

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