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  5. "Er isst eine Orange."

"Er isst eine Orange."

Translation:He eats an orange.

June 20, 2013

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/japs4you

how to find whether eine will be consider as "a" or "an" .... i am confused .... Thanks :)

December 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leila.hb

it has nothing to do with "eine"! it's about English grammar; when a word begins with a vowel u should use "an" and when it begins with a consonant u should use "a"

December 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kryozzen

I don't think there is "a" and "an" in German. Ein is used before Masculine and Neuter terms and Eine is used before Feminine terms.

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_Rhodes

Why is this ¸eine Orange"? I thought the word was ¸Apfelsine", or at least it was when I took a year of German in school, in 1983.

June 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ll_duo

"Orange" and "Apfelsine" are synonyms.

In Southern Germany you would rather say "Orange", in the North rather "Apfelsine". Wikipedia taught me this right now... I say "Orange" (I am living in Baden-Württemberg, thats in the south of Germany), but I know what "Apfelsine" is, just wouldn't use the word. So Wikipedia seems to be right. ;-)

June 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProjectHopeless

How do we know if they are saying that is he an orange?

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlvinLarss

In speech you can't, you'd simply have to rely on context (and maybe the fact that you don't usually say "he is an orange").

In writing however, "isst" ([he/she/it] eats) has an extra s compared to "ist" ([he/she/it] is).

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pparker91

i dont under stand why eine is considered one in this circumstance.

July 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattl80

It is 'eine' because "Die Orange" is feminine and both nominative and accusative feminine 'a/an' are 'eine'.

September 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wilhelmnaslund

i like orange juice

December 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardsdar

Die Orange is feminine. In German you'll need to get used to the idea of adjective/article endings changing dependant on the gender of the nouns and the case (nominative, accusative, dative, or possessive).

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kryozzen

Why not? Ein and Eine both means "a" or "one". Ein is used before Masculine and Neuter terms and Eine is used before Feminine terms. Apple is considered Masculine term. So "An apple" will be "Ein Apfel". Do note that "An" is not an issue here. Orange is considered Female. So "An orange" will be "Eine Orange". Again, "An" has nothing to do with it.

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunshine4271

It's not one it's an

August 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

its so difficult to pronounce "orange" in german ! can anybody help ??

January 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkMoon4

It was borrowed from the french word for orange. If you look it up on a pronunciation website like Forvo, you can listen to French speakers say it; it's basically the same. Good luck, hope that helps!

January 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

thanks !!

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RavenVally

but if the word is "an" shouldn't it be "einen" instead of "eine"

May 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ericlee11

I have same question

May 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JusDesi

It's because einen only applies to masculine nouns in the accusative case, not neuter or feminine ones

May 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AChubbyUnicorn

THANK YOU I've been getting various questions wrong because technically the nouns were in accusative so, I thought it would become 'einen' or 'den'. Couldn't figure out what I was doing wrong!

August 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kryozzen

So far I know, there is no "An" in German. Einen is used for Accusative Masculine Terms. Just like "Der" changes to "Den" before Accusative Masculine Terms. Ein and Eine both means "a" or "one". Ein is used before Masculine and Neuter terms and Eine is used before Feminine terms. Apple is considered Masculine term. So "An apple" will be "Ein Apfel". Do note that "An" is not an issue here. If the apple is the accusative term, then "Ein Apfel" will change to "Einen Apfel". Same will happen for "Der Apple" which will change to "Den Apfel" Orange is considered Female. So "An orange" will be "Eine Orange". Again, "An" has nothing to do with it.

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bero_brho

how could you know what are you hearing “er isst“ or “ihr esst“

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JusDesi

Well, it's not easy my friend. However, if you listen carefully, you'll here "eh" in the beginning for Er and a long "e" sound for Ihr as in "beet" or "street"

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/titofebrianto

What ia different simple present with simple present continuos in grammatical deutch? Thanks

August 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sylvie993

Sorry, I dont understand why in similar sentences we say "einen Apfel", because of its role as a complement, but in this situation we simply write "eine". :S

August 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlvinLarss

It has to do with the genders of the words, and the accusative and dative cases.

First off the genders of the words. "Apfel" is masculine, meaning it has the der article, so you would just say "ein Apfel", while Orange is feminine meaning it's "die Orange", and then we make the ein "eine".

Then there's also accusative. Accusative case is when something is the accusative object of a sentence, IE Subject verb X, like he eats X, then X is the accusative object. And when a word is the accusative object and it's masculine, the article changes from der to den, which is why we have "einen Apfel". Dative is basically the same thing (but under different conditions of course), but der and das becomes dem, die becomes der, and die (in plural) becomes der+n.

There are also words which explicitly control either dative or accusative (and sometimes both), but they're for another time.

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dearlunatic

How could I know I heard"er isst"or"ihr esst"?

September 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrskoolcat22

i think its pretty easy

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harry_Edward

I said he is eating a orange, but it said the answer was 'he is eating 1 orange' and on here it says 'an' make your mind up

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MihkelMold

why is "He is eating an orange" an incorrect answer?

November 25, 2018
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