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"¿Cuándo sale el autobús para México?"

Translation:When does the bus for Mexico leave?

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/djangosChef

In English, "when does the bus for Mexico leave" is something you might ask at the bus station, where there are other buses. But if you were traveling by tour bus, stopped in some locale, and Mexico was the next stop, you wouldn't - instead you'd ask "when does the bus leave for Mexico" Can this Spanish sentence be used in both cases? Does "para Mexico" modify "autobus" or "sale" (or is it ambiguous)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfred-00

Theres only two ways of putting this sentence : ¿Cuándo sale el autobús para mexico? Or ¿Cuándo sale para mexico el autobús? And it doesn't really matter when you use it. And "para mexico" modifies the verb "salir"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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The word "autobus" doesn't exist in english?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galesl

No.

  • Bus
  • mini-bus (UK English for a van with seats, private transportation for an organization e.g. a school)
  • omnibus (archaic, the full Latin word that is the source of "bus". Only really used in the UK legal term "The man on the Clapham omnibus", meaning an ordinary person. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_man_on_the_Clapham_omnibus )

But not "autobus".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuchman

interestingly, in German they abbreviate a central bus station as ZOB (Zentraler Omnibus-Bahnhof)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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Yes, it does, but not meaning the motor vehicle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autobus_%28cycling%29

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galesl

Interesting, I'd never heard that before (even though I've watched cycling events like the Tour and the Giro on TV). I suspect it's an import brought in by European non-native-English-speakers (who tend to dominate the culture of professional cycling).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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Well, I learned it from listening to Phil Liggett, so it might be a Brit-ism.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alondra254063

Autobus is Bus

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thomas2
thomas2
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Why not "when is the bus leaving for Mexico?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamRawlinson

Why not 'the bus leave for Mexico?' Reasonable to assume the bus for Mexico is the bus that leaves for Mexico? ;-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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When does the bus leave for Mexico is now accepted
12/3/2013

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkmrnn

In a previous answer "hacia Mexico" was used instead of "para Mexico." What is the difference between the two?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ares12082

why not "when does the bus leave for mexico"? Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pericoro61
Pericoro61Plus
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When does the bus leave for Mexico or when does the bus for Mexico leave is a language issue... :-)

I would say both are correct. if you say the sentences out loud the correct answer is a mouthful. why not accept both?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamRawlinson

Yes, and I have been thinking about this, the purpose of good communication is understanding, so is there any difference in understanding in these two versions, and do both versions exist having the same difference in understanding? So what is the difference? If I ask 'when does the bus for Mexico leave then I am not saying, really, that I am going to Mexico, I am merely asking about the bus, I may get off before Mexico. But if I ask 'when does the bus leave for Mexico' then it strongly suggests I am going to Mexico, city of course. So, that is the difference in English, a tiny one which may have regional differences. Now do the same two 'communication' options exist in Spanish and if so how does one say eahc one?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Is it Mexico or Mexico city?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galesl

It depends on the context. If you were located in another country when saying it, it would mean Mexico the country. If you were in Mexico the country, then it would mean Mexico City.

I live in Puebla, just a couple of hours from Mexico City, and people here are always talking about taking the bus back and forth from México, meaning the city.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/afrostewie

Why not "When does the bus leave TO Mexico?" ?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kittykat501

Why doesn't it accept 'when's the bus leaving for Mexico'

4 months ago