"Have you never run?"

Translation:Heb jij nooit gerend?

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cioboteacristian

What don't we use "zijn" instead of "hebben" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natnat34

With motion verbs, you use "zijn" when the motion has a goal/destination or a direction. The rest of the time, you can use "hebben".

  • Ik ben naar huis gerend. (= destination)
  • ik ben rechtdoor gerend. (= direction)
  • Ik heb deze week tien kilometer gerend. (= no destination and no direction)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1241

Hi Natnat. Very simple but interesting. I am a Dutch native speaker, but I didn't know that rule. Thank you. Cheers, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natnat34

No worries. If you check this link, they explain it even better than what I did (it's at the end of the lesson) : https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3859133

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1241

Thank you, Natnat, really very kind! Best wishes, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/as2907
as2907
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 20
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 3

You can or you have to? "Ben jij nooit gerend?" is not accepted, so it seems that one actually must use "heb" in this case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natnat34

You're right, it's more a "have to" than a "can" situation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedcook

Bedankt.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StudentTaal1

The usage of "never" sounds odd to me, I would use "ever", is it normal in Dutch or is it just a sentence good for training?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

If you use ever (ooit) you're asking the opposite.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StudentTaal1

Yes, I mean that when you don't know the answer you usually ask about the positive option. Asking for the negative doesn't sound natural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

You never ask if someone doesn't do/hasn't done something?

Either way, there is no context so it may well be that you do know the answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TWSingh
TWSingh
  • 23
  • 2
  • 85

I also struggle to know when "nog" should be added before "nooit"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanTuts

"Heb je nooit gelopen?" zou toch ook correct moeten zijn, niet?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 141

Lopen in the meaning of to run is only used in Belgium, this is a Dutch (Nederland) course. In the Netherlands lopen only means to walk, rennen is to run.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edwin.walker

It's confusing knowing other Germanic languages in this instance. Scandinavian løbe/løpe/löpa mean to run as well as German laufen (which I believe also means to walk). Eloping is also the act of running away to get married (from Dutch ontlopen, in fact). It's just pretty interesting that lopen takes on this meaning specifically in the Netherlands

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fephen
fephen
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3

This is not true. For runners 'lopen' can besides the usual meaning (English: to walk) also have the meaning 'rennen'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanTuts

Oh, ok!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haelgeweertjie

Are there any other words for run? Because I am trying to figure out where the Afrikaans 'om te hardloop' comes from. Baie dankie

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 141

Hardlopen exists in Dutch as well, this is running as a sporting exercise. Rennen is used in basically all other situations, e.g. when you run to catch a bus. Those are the two forms of running. And regarding other forms of using one's legs there are wandelen and kuieren which mean to walk, the latter is even more relaxed/casual than wandelen. And there's also the sport racewalking, which is snelwandelen in Dutch. Together with lopen that pretty much covers it. One nice one to mention is uitwaaien, basically this is a walk on the beach or on the dijk/dunes when it's windy. A nice way to clear one's mind or "een frisse neus halen". :)

One confusing thing is that hardlopen can be shortened to lopen when it's clear from context that hardlopen is meant, so runners will often do this. Also sentences like ik loop de marathon or ik loop de 100 meter are the normal way to refer to the running sport.

BTW in Belgium, lopen (to run) and stappen (to walk) have different meanings than in the Netherlands (respectively to walk and to go out). This can be confusing to Dutch and Belgians too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haelgeweertjie

Baie baie dankie!! That was one thorough explanation. Ek kan nie wag om meer Nederlands te leer nie. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1241

Dag Jan. In Nederland is "lopen" niet "rennen"(to run),maar daar het de betekenis van "hardlopen" aanneemt (hier dus), wordt jou suggestie voor deze keer door Duo aanvaard. Ik was verstrooid, schreef (gedreven door mijn Vlaamse intuitie) "lopen" ipv "rennen",maar aardige Duo nam het aan! Joepi. Lu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larthienn

Why "u" and not "jij"n

10 months ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.