"Es una nota al pie de la página."

Translation:It is a footnote.

5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/M.Uijttewaal
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english indeed is a very efficient language...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
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Sometimes. Sometimes you need a huge English phrase to say something for which you only need two words in Spanish. At other moments you need a lot of Spanish words to translate one single English word (as in this case). It's actually quite fascinating.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Buy some thing that requires instruction for its use. If it has multiple languages in the instruction book, English is often the shortest. IKEA pictograms are, of course, the most concise.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

English is shortest because they know American men that assemble stuff don't read the directions anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

I think that (classical) Latin beats all other (non-IKEAn) languages in terms of brevity. The price you pay for that is probably the most complex grammar of all Indo-European languages. What is interesting though, is that while all or almost all (I am not sure about Romansch and Romanian) Romance languages have articles, Latin does not.

The real question is - why does the world not speak IKEAnese and why is there not an IKEA tree on Duolingo? Personally, I blame the Freemasons.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mslade81

I think English mostly shines against Spanish (and French that i know of) when describing proper noun ownership. "Joe's car" becomes "the car of Joe" when directly translated. Spanish lacks the useful 's shortcut English has.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdantone

Well said fella. There's another one on here "habrían podido caminar" which translates to "the would have been able to walk." So it definitely goes both ways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Some more thoughts on language efficiency. I deconstructed some of the sentences in a couple of lessons and found that a lot of Spanish sentences had a longer character count, but a smaller word count. Many Spanish words were longer but in to say "I run" in English requires two words. In Spanish you have the option to say just "Corro."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rakudajin

Look at japanese or chinese :o) That's what is efficient :o)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Light10c
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Consider this: "Damelo" = "give it to me"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swedishmaid
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thought the same thing. es una pie nota or nota de pie would've been equally efficient.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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Rats. I was translating literally, and put "It is a note at the bottom of the page." Double rats.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarnes
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This is now accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

Odd. That's what I started to put, but instead decided to be even more literal and said instead "foot of the page," not even thinking about "footnote." And "foot of the page," tho' more awkward than "bottom …," was marked as correct. Head games; Hal the fiendish computer likes to play head games with us.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baker910

I think that would have been accepted had you put "the foot of the page" instead of "the bottom" because "pie" directly translates to foot.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
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Yes, i put "… at the foot of the page." and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
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We must all go to Spain to use the calqued word "pienota", so that it can become a real part of the language! Of course, then all the Italians will laugh at us. . . .

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmoore3

why do you not mention the word page? Is that redundant in the translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
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Apparently, the only way to say footnote in Spanish is: "nota al pie de la página". It's more of a description, they don't really have a dedicated word for it. But English does have a word for it, so you can just translate that whole thing as "footnote".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
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Yes. Where else would a footnote be?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eaarthman

SpanishDict.com says you can say footnote this way: "nota a pie de página." Note the lack of definite articles.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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Try giving SpanishDict.com a phrase instead of a word. That way, you get translations from three sources. (The third one is usually the best one.)

For "a footnote", it gives "una nota al pie", "Una nota al pie", "una nota al pie de la página".

For "footnote" by itself, SpanishDict.com gives "la nota al pie de página" now. One more article (al vs a) than the one you got.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baker910

I wouldn't trust that website anymore. It doesn't make any sense to not use definite articles. That just translates to "note at foot of page."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgengrauen
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of course it makes perfect sense. how many definite articles to you need to understand the meaning of "note AT foot OF page"? Many languages don't use definite articles all the time. Russian for example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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But English does use definite articles in this case. You'll be understood if you leave out the articles, but you will sound like your native language is one that doesn't use articles.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgengrauen
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baker910 was NOT speaking about an English sentence, but a Spanish one. -> "That just translates to "note at foot of page.""

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anmae

JGGarrick62 you'r funny! i love it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iCRICKET

Another one of those completely unintelligible sentences towards the end.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grant30
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I had "It is a footnote of the page" and was marked wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
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I think Duolingo is right marking that as an error, because "of the page" is referring to the foot, and not to the note/footnote. I wrote a literal translation "It's a note at the foot of the page" and it was right for Duolingo (although it could probably sound weird).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWalker

It is a note at the foot of the page. Note at the foot = footnote. It is a footnote of the page. It's not a big deal, and I understand your argument, but when you have a descriptive phrase rather than a definitive word, it opens the door to different translations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
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It's accepted now.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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It is a footnote on the page = accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpsevin

I entered, foot note, and was marked wrong. In my dictionary the actual note is given as "foot note". Providing/entering said note is given as, to footnote. ("Please footnote the this for clarification." "Thank you, your foot note was well done."). I love duolingo, but at times it is frustrating.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
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I dont't know which dictionary you used but "footnote" is one word: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/foot%20note

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpsevin

Thanks for the reply: Old print dictionary. I guess the center point for that word entry was blurred out making it look like separate words (don't know what I spilled there all those years ago). Thanks again.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
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Maybe it was juice?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredbach

I said "It is a footnote of the page" and was marked correct. The rule seems to be: it is okay to say more than necessary.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kannd86

Why can this not be "It is a footnote about the page"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mimawbaubo
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about would be sobre I believe

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brennan1996

who knew... footnote is only one word...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nevaabrar

What is a footnote? Is is the same as a footprint?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

In (usually) academic writing, footnotes are "extra" explanatory text or, perhaps, the source of the information cited. They are located at the bottom of the page. Sometimes they are located at the end of the chapter or book, but then they're usually called something else (such as endnotes).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dnaliw
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Is there any reason that "There is a note at the foot of the page" is wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sturdel

"Es una" would suggest "it is" so "there is" isn't really correct. I think it would be "Hay una..." for there is.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghostofthefuture
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I think such a sentence would have used the word "Hay" at the front for "There is."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

"It's a note at the foot of the page" was a correct translation, but not "it's a note on the foot of the page." Aren't they pretty much the same?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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"a note on" usually means "a note about", "a note on the subject of".

So "a note on the foot of the page" sounds weird to my ear. But strangely, "a note on the page" seems ok to my ear, so maybe it's just me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gulizbayram
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"it is a footnote of the page" is accepted

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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It is a footnote on the page = also accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NUJV
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tried to use common sense and entered : 'it's a note at the bottom of the page' was accepted

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
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Spanish speakers should start borrowing "fútnota", ha!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frostera
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'it's a footnote to the page' wasn't accepted. Does that make sense? Makes sense to me, oh well

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

yes it DOES make sense, this is a common expression in english and even though "de" means "of", "a footnote of the page" is less commonly used than " a footnote TO the page" or at least they are equally used....in my experience anyways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimshlif

Is "there is a footnote" an incorrect translation? If so, how would you say that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Hay = "There is" or "There are"

Hay una nota al pie de la página.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoodieG

I thought, 'note at the foot of the page' or 'footnote' but the only definition it gave for 'nota' here was 'notice' so I put that. Buzzer says.... wrong! lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
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"footnote" was accepted as a correct translation. the 'drop-downs" are NOT necessarily correct. They are only choices and sometimes none of the choices are correct. I use a dictionary or on-line sources when I don't know a word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khalil3x6

answered: "It's a footnote to the page." Why wasn't it accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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Because on or of are more common prepositions for this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshaan96

Can someone breakdown the sentence for me? Why was al used?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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"a" can mean "on" in the sense of position. So "al pie"= "a el pie" = "on the foot".

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/a

(posición)
está a la derecha/izquierda - it's on the right/left
a orillas del mar - by the sea

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshaan96

It's a note on the foot of the page! Now it makes sense :P Is Spanish short on words?! En can be used in so many ways! :P Thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anmae

why not " notice" at the foot of the page?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anmae

to mslade81 to answer the question : what is it? in this case, English 4 words, in Spanish 8 words, in French 5 words : c est un renvoi (it is a renvoi) a "renvoi" is always at the foot of the page

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aka_pushkin

I'm sick of "at". I'm really sick of "at". "Arrived at", "at the bottom". Common! I'm not a native speaker and it might not be a super correct language to say "arrive to" and "on the bottom", but heck, I came here to learn SPANISH.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
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:-D Even those of us who are native English speakers can't help also learning about English while taking this course.

4 years ago
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