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https://www.duolingo.com/ngscott

1864 (tv-serie)

Hej allesammen!

The main thread mentions that you can see some TV on the DR website right around the world, but I thought it would be worth pointing out (if it hasn't been already) that the mini-series 1864 has two episodes up at dr.dk, which I think you can watch anywhere in the world (no pesky geoblocking).

I see it has received mixed reviews in places, but it basically has every Danish actor if you've seen more internationally known shows like Borgen or Forbrydelsen. It also has the advantage of being able to put the subtitles on, which is very handy when you are trying to get a grip on the language (though when the Germans start speaking, it is a very confusing time for us non-dansk and tysk speakers!).

Not sure how long the first episode can be accessed for, so check it out!

2
3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Tusind tak for dette!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Me again. I just watched the first part (2 1/2 hours to watch a 57 min film, what with stopping to read the subtitles and make notes - I've got a vocab list to keep me busy for a while).

I thought it was, frankly, great. And the language was not all that difficult, once I discovered how to turn the subtitles on ["undertekster", in the row of buttons with the full-screen mode, if there's anybody else in the world who doesn't know where to find it]. I'll look up the words and watch it again tomorrow. Don't put it off because you've only started the Danish course, because dialogue is usually a lost easier than description and the action provides the context. (For the historical background, I'll try Wikipedia on the period.)

The series (8 parts, two are up at http://www.dr.dk/tv/se/1864/1864-1-8#!/) apparently will interweave the events of the mid-19th century with those of present-day Denmark. In one scene, of interest to those learning the pronouns of Danish, a - lost young woman? with piercings, is talking to the ancient Baron of the locality (in hopes of robbing him to be able to pay her drug dealer) and she addresses him as "du." He informs her that at the castle [slot - more a manor house than a castle] er man Des, but she continues with du, and when he asks about "Deres forældre" she plainly doesn't know what he's talking about: "Whose parents?"

Definitely worth the trip.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/km1
km1
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Thanks posting this, I'm looking forward to it. The website says all the episodes are available until 31. december 2014.

Tip if you click on "program info" link you find this (Kan ses indtil:31 December 2014)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Thanks! That takes some of the pressure off.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atlas.ooe
atlas.ooe
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Thanks for the suggestion. This is a very interesting scenario. I've watched it with subtitles and understood most of the context although obviously not every word and sentence. My favourite scene was when the Danish boy asked the gypsy if Germans and Austrians are bad human beings. That was probably the first time he heard a different opinion about the "evil Germans". Propaganda was pretty strong back than in Denmark.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngscott

Weirdly, I think it is a bit of an advantage that the main characters, I guess, start off as kids. It gives you a bit of time to warm up to the language!

I think it's an enjoyable show, so good to see some others have checked it out. I'm not disciplined enough to keep a track of vocab and rely on simple osmosis to learn it, which is clearly not as effective ahah.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

As an incentive: you can learn some of the words that you won't learn from the standard DL lessons (as I discovered after starting to work through my look-up list). Maybe for a bonus course DL could do a few hundred words from the series? Using * in the appropriate places to get past English-language censor-robots. Since they're freely used by the Danish children in the first episode - and Danish kids today are apparently allowed more linguistic freedom in the classroom than are kids in America - the Danish originals should be ok, right?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

BTW, they could simply entitle it "Idioms." No sense bothering de fine folk with what we're up to.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomseLauge
ThomseLauge
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As a Danish person (and kid haha) I can confirm that we have a lot of "linguistic freedom". Swearing is not really swearing here anymore, it's simply part of the language. Of course you exclude those words and phrases when being polite but otherwise it's just regular talking. The only time you would get called out at school as a Danish kid for your language would be if you cursed at someone by calling them something derogatory. But then again, the part of Denmark where I grew up and live is famous for crude language (Mid/Eastern Jutland) so it might just be my area haha :D

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Do you think it's actually likely that the modern-day teenager in the film could not switch to the polite form, especially when asked to use it? And that she really wouldn't recognize when the speaker of the polite form inquired, politely, about Her/Their parents?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomseLauge
ThomseLauge
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Yes. We all know that swearing is a habit that can be hard to break, and as for the grammatical politeness, well that has been practically extinct in daily speech since a bit before the beginning of the new millennium. I was born in 1997 and I have only ever been addressed with the polite grammar (I don't know how else to phrase it sorry) in letters from my bank. I don't recall ever using it either. Today it's all in the tone of voice and choice of words when Danes are polite in day to day life. My sister is two years younger than me, and when watching the show she was as confused as the girl when he asked her to use the polite form. We don't really use the titles anymore, like Hr. (Mr.), Frue (Mrs.), and Frøken (Miss), except in very formal letters from say the bank. Hope that clears it up a bit :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomseLauge
ThomseLauge
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(Of course the older generations might use it, but us rude youngsters do not)

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Thank you - that was exactly the kind of information I was looking for. (Also thanks for Frøken - I've seen the first two, but I'd have had to look that last one up.)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomseLauge
ThomseLauge
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No problem. Glad to help

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaneTR

And, if you want to practice even more Danish, or if you can't wait for the fifth episode, check these articles (in Danish) from our national newspaper about how costful the production of 1864 has been.

http://www.b.dk/nationalt/pia-kjaersgaard-jeg-er-dybt-rystet-over-1864-serien "Pia Kjærsgaard: I am very shocked about the 1864 series"

http://www.information.dk/511964 "Should '1864' have been produced in Denmark?"

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Reply3 years ago