"Noi l'abbiamo fatta tutta."

Translation:We made all of it..

June 20, 2013

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pataglu

"fatta" ? I thought it was "noi abbiamo fatto". Can someone explain why is it "fatta" instead of "fatto" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayamel

Hi Pataglu, In the "passato prossimo", there is an agreement between the verb and the direct object if the latter comes before the verb. Here the "l' " in "l'abbiamo" is a direct object and the use of "tutta" indicates that it represents a feminine noun. The same rule applies in french.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelmutKrhl

I agree. But why do they give as translation in English "We have done i t all". Shouldn't it be "We have done h e r all"? (Whatever her might refer to).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

La con both be translated as her and it, but from context you understand it's the second option, since you can't "do her". It's just a femenine "it" (not a person).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterSigno3

We did it all. Accepted Friday 07-Jan-2022


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

Noi = we
l' (la) = it (something feminine, like perhaps a boat, - una barca)
abbiamo = we have
fatta = made (her, - the boat)
tutta = all (of her)

We have made all of her/it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaBuzza

Una frase così per noi significa solo che siamo andati in bagno e l'abbiamo fatta tutta ( la cacca) ah ah Sarebbe stato più corretto noi abbiamo fatto tutto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EstelleTweedie

We have done everything???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

"We did it all" is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

Duo offers "we made all of it." Wouldn't that need to be "Noi ne abbiamo fatto tutto?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

"All of [something]" is English usage, but does 'of' actually exist in the Italian?

Italian uses ne to replace an object preceded by di or da, or a direct object accompanied by a number or an adjective of quantity. You could argue that tutto is such an adjective, but it represents the whole, not a quantity. I think the plural tutti/e would have a much stronger case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayamel

Can it be understood as "we all did it" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

The placement of tutta in this sentence would not suggest that. We all did it would be noi tutti l'abbiamo fatto (or noi tutti facevamo)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catia9
  • 1634

I got this right! Wow, I must be learning!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vernon397

Where does 'thing' come in the phrase. ('Noi l'abbiamo fatta tutta cosa' or something like this??)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkaticic

From l' = it (in l'abbiamo)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattiapascal

To find out, try excluding the words you know from the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derek199688

I agree with GregHullender


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The___Idler

"We made it all" is accepted. But after seeing Duo's translation this seems equivocal to me. I imagine a group of youngsters who all passed a test succesfully. This makes me appreciate Duo's translation. Any native English speaker here to confirm or refute my suspicion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusieOpperia

Okay, I've seen this sentence many times and can remember understanding it as "We made all of it." But, now, when I looked at it during a speaking exercise, I see "We have done everything for her." I've seen the indirect object pronouns mean mean "to" or "for." The next time I see the sentence in a writing exercise, I'll try my interpretation. :)

Can "le" be used here to mean "for her" or would I have to use "per lei"?

Thanks.

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