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"He walks into the kitchen."

Translation:Él entra en la cocina.

5 years ago

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ncrebert

camina is not a part of this sentence?!?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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camina is more like taking a walk. The Spanish phrase here is: "he enters the kitchen".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dr.ronsweeney

But the question did not ask for enters. It said walks into. For beginner-level learners, that is a trick question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keirdre
keirdre
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Totally agree. Very much seems like a trick question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErichMinya

All the questions are tricks!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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¡Recuerdo la lección a causa de la injusticia!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S.Walker1

Language learning is naturally full of what seem like trick questions. It is what it is. If you want to learn how to speak and write correctly, you have to learn it. (I missed this one, too!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schultz4

The problem is that the Spanish translation is sloppy then. If we removed the "kitchen" from this example and used "parking garage" instead, it becomes more obvious.

"He enters the parking garage" does not tell you the means used to enter at all. He could have driven, walked, or even have been thrown into the parking garage for all the reader knows with no context. However, "He walks into the parking garage" is much more specific.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Also, it could be part of a conversation in which one person asks how he came into the kitchen (walked, crawled, ran etc)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damarx
damarx
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The thing is that the two languages have different verb systems. In the situation of this example, Spanish uses "entrar" or a few specific synonyms, such as "adentrarse". English has tons of "phrasal verbs" for the same situation, such as "get in", "step in", "go in", "walk into" and many more combinations, with very specific meanings, and they will generally sound terrible or make no sense when translated word by word.

For example, "Entrar" necessarily needs the preposition "en", whereas "walk" doesn't necessarily need the preposition "into". In fact, each preposition added to "walk" creates a whole new verb. And neither Spanish nor Portuguese have this kind of thing. The verb formation in these languages is much more restrictive and the specifics should be added as adverbs (or adverbial phrases) if you really want to express them.

Eg: "He ran into the house" = "Él entró en la casa (corriendo)".

"He walks into the kitchen" = "Él entra en la cocina (caminando/andando)".

So, whenever you see a phrasal verb, beware: you will have to find the most suitable verb in Spanish, and it will probably have a more general meaning than in English. I suggest you to forget the individual words of the phrasal verb and stick to the general idea. Cover the details with adverbs, if they're essential for the meaning you want to convey.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdtrask1
sdtrask1
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Thank you. I really appreciate instructive explanations such as yours. Have a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cindynomad

I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rositaconamor

I agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe723945

"El camina a la cocina" worked for me. (Minus the accent on El")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleGoetz
KyleGoetz
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The Spanish phrase's official English pair given to me is "walks into" not "enters," so wouldn't caminar and andar both fit if you satisfied the "into" part?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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Spanish doesn't really have a word for "into". If you want to say: "he walks into a building", then what you have to say in Spanish is literally: "He enters a building".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

What if he were drinking, texting etc, not paying attention and walked into a building (bumping into the wall. Not actually entering.?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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Good question. I'm not sure but I think they'd use the word 'tropezar con' or 'chocar con'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

How about "él pone el lápiz en la caja"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErichMinya

Ok :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shafica

Ok. That makes sense now. Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErichMinya

Not andar

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I got this as English "He walks into the kitchen." I believe the English translation is not perfect. A better translation for "Él entra en la cocina" is "He goes into the kitchen" because "goes" does not convey the method (by walking, crawling, wheelchair, running, etc.).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ncrebert

thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil46

Walks is not there in the Spanish translation? Entra en-go into? is not walks?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

It does accept "Él camina a la cocina." and in my opinion that's a better translation for this sentence then "Él entra en la cocina."

Because if it's "Él entra en la cocina." how do we know that he's not entering the kitchen by running, crawling, flying, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seelian
seelian
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i also reply "camina a la cocina" and it was accept.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Good they must have fixed it :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ImpInTraining

"Él camina a la cocina." was also right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

"He walks into the kitchen" is not a good translation, IMO. "He" could be in a wheelchair, on rollerblades, crawling, being carried, or a host of other situation, wherein "Él entra en la cocina" applies but "He walks into the kitchen" does not. "He enters the kitchen" more accurately reflects the non-specific meaning here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

I agree 100% but I also think that this might be an exercise for us to know what to translate into Spanish if were translating an English article and came across this phrase - instead of using the Spanish verb for "to walk".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gopabur

In this case the the question definately stated walked (as apposed to other methods of entry). If "entra" is required then the question should have been " he enters the kitchen", as other people above have indicated.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocosm

Yes, I agree. I think to emphasize the walking part you could say "Él entra en la cocina andando", though I don't know if DL accepts this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisMcKnight

If they wanted enters, they should have asked for enters! It's not as if the phrase "he enters the kitchen" wouldn't make sense in English. If you flip the question and ask for the English translation of "Él entra en la cocina" would you get "he walks into the kitchen"??? Would it be right to mark someone who translated that as "he enters the kitchen" as wrong"? What a low down, dirty trick of a question!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabocat
sabocat
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"el entra en la cocina" or "el entra a la cocina" are both accepted true. walk into already mean entra so why do we need "en" or "a" before "la"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crystal_Seas

This was my question too. why is "él entra la cocina" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiamDelaylay
LiamDelaylay
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It is correct, I am reporting it now :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexfrist18

Why el camina en la cocina is not correct i thought camina means walk

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jessmg7

Wouldn't that mean "he walks in the kitchen," not "into"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skwillard1

First, i got this wrong too. Second, I think they're trying to give us a slightly better understanding of the word which they did...it's not about getting it right the first time, it's about learning. "Trick question" for beginners?!... please duolingo don't adjust for that person I'm learning bc of these types of questions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

da big fella explains a language quirk, for want of a better word. In Spanish they enter into a building, kitchen, etc. It is just the verb they use. It is a bit like ''having ten years' rather than being ten years (old).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

Dl if you want us to translate enters the kitchen, then say so. but if you say walks, you should allow for some more translations. If the phrase is an idiom. It should be in a lesson on idioms. at the least, if you are trying to expand the definition of entrar to be walks into, then that should be in the hint.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mr_andresrios

I speak Spanish and English perfect, and this sentence is wrong! La respuesta correcta sería: "Él camina en la cocina".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/megustamivida

"perfectly."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PupherFish

You speak it 'perfect'ly

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlchism

I wrote "El camina en la cocina" and it was marked wrong because it was supposed to be "El camina a la cocina"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

'Like he was walking onto a yacht'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennyFormanek

Surely it should be a choice between caminar and there should be an alternative answer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Guy

Dead horse and all that, but how about " Él entra en la cocina caminando". I didn't put this into the lesson, but could it dispel the ambiguity of "entrar"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleGoetz
KyleGoetz
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Would Él anda a la cocina work as a translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Kyle: Just entered that and lost a heart. Duolingo does not like "andar."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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That would mean something like he goes to the kitchen which is not the same thing as he walks into the kitchen.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom_Franks

My problem is that I wish duolingo would give us the infinitive of the verb so I could tell if I should conjugate by dropping the ar-, er-, or ir-. If I knew it was "entrar" I would not have been wrong. I know this program tries to help us learn by being corrected, as a child would learn English. I guess I'm just used to the old way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maudbenoit

Every time you see two options differing in male/female endings...pick them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
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I don't understand the use of "en" (entra en la cocina) For me it sounds more natural to say "entra a la"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

Alas, "entra en" is natural for speakers of Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I think it can mean both "to walk" or to "enter". why "él camina en la cocina" is false?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

Maybe because "en" is ambiguous - he walks into the kitchen vs. he walks [with]in the kitchen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Should be 'he goes into the kitchen' then

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

Is it just me, or does this lesson seem full of traps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajar
tajar
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May we decide whether we are translating for sense or word for word. Word for word translations are often inaccurate in that they violate the speech, ans thought, patterns of one or both languages. However, if the program is trying to see if we remember some word or other, then we should be asked for the exact words.

In English, we can formulate both sentences: He entered and He walked into...n'est pas?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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For me caminar piede ser justo, así como entrar

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S0R0USH
S0R0USH
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This sentence does not imply if walking literally took place. I am reporting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

I have read many of the remarks and it seems we are all on the same page. I used camina as that is what it said. I do feel like sometimes we are being tricked, but then again quite often I am just wrong!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

I have read many of the remarks and it seems we are all on the same page. I used camina as that is what it said. I do feel like sometimes we are being tricked, but then again quite often I am just wrong!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

I have read many of the remarks and it seems we are all on the same page. I used camina as that is what it said. I do feel like sometimes we are being tricked, but then again quite often I am just wrong!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inthetropics

I used camina because it is possible to enter without walking.He could be in a wheelchair.I think this is enters the kitchen and I am not allowed such licence when I translate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

I just crawled into my kitchen to disprove you. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gopabur

Perhaps the following will satisfy both the enter and walk camps...

él entra en la habitación caminando

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanashiaOl

The question should say He enters the kitchen because the answer had nothing to do with walking

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suzarci

It told me it could be El camina a la cocina.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mfaru123

esto era muy facil no se como bosotros aves fallado

3 years ago