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"The business people do not like the new tax either."

Translation:A los empresarios tampoco les gusta la nueva tasa.

5 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Airnavigator
Airnavigator
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"Business people" can also be translated as "Gente de negocios", and the word "tax" in Spanish also accounts for "impuesto".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Waldimirs

tax = impuesto and NOT tasa

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gus_tavo2000
gus_tavo2000
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totally agree, we don't use tasa we use impuesto

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kyladuffy

Also agree. I have never heard the word tasa for "tax." It's "impuesto."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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6/17/2014 Impuesto not accepted for tax. I'm reporting it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piccolute74
piccolute74
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A year later and still wrong. I'm fluent in Spanish and still can't get through the "skip lesson" quizzes because of things like these.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronniebrasco

I guess you are doing this for fun

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uah0F82ZOXk for the difference between tasa, contribucion, y impuesto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WkHh

I am confused at what exactly "tampoco" does here. Is tampoco only negative? Can't it mean "either" or "neither"? Why isn't it "tampoco no les gusta"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heterotroph

It makes the sentence negative by itself. "A mí tampoco me gusta." = I don't like it either.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mytilludie

I never knew you could say "tampoco me gusta" and not use "no" in the sentence.. interesting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgethomps89

omg same

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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so if I wanted to say i don't like the new tax, the literal translation would be, "to me the new tax appeals either," or "...the new tax appeals as well," or "appeals nor" ...??? this seems crazy. I'm just pulling up the various translations of "tampoco" here. This is where explanatory material would really help

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pogosticksteve
Pogosticksteve
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What? If you want to say "I don't like the new tax" then you would just say "No me gusta el nuevo impuesto." If you want to say "I don't like the new tax EITHER" then you would say "Tampoco me gusta el nuevo impuesto/la nueva tasa"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pogosticksteve
Pogosticksteve
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Think of tampoco as being the negative form of también. Literally kind of like "I also don't like that"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffJonesJr
CliffJonesJr
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Interesting. So we have "tambien", which is literally "as well" ("tan bien") with the same meaning, and then we have "tampoco" ("tan poco"), which is kind of like "as little". So in a way, you're saying, "I like that as little as you do."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

That's very helpful. I had always found "tampoco" confusing. Many thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpash
dpash
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Or possibly easier is to think of it as neither rather than either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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This is probably a situation where trying to translate word for word between different languages doesn't work out. Just accept that you use tampoco instead of no when you want to add that sense of 'neither', job done!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TildeSteele
TildeSteele
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Thanks - I could not figure out why "no" was incorrect either!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Maybe the literal translation is "To me, the new tax appeals neither" or "To me, the new tax is not pleasing either." I think Pogosticksteve has it right when he says to think of "tampoco" as the negation of "también." Gave a lingot to him and to CliffJonesJr for the same reason.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffJonesJr
CliffJonesJr
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As I understand it, "tambien" comes from "tan bien" and literally means "as well". "Tampoco" therefore means something like "as little". If I say I like dogs, you might say "I do as well," (using "tambien"). If I say I don't like dogs, you might say "I like them as little as you do," (using "tampoco").

Granted, the English examples I give sound really stilted, but you get the idea. That's why no negation is needed (or even acceptable, I believe).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FoolOnThePlanet

Impuesto should at least be an alternative answer and not wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espomama
espomama
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same here, I put impuesto nuevo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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I hope all four of you who put "impuesto" instead of "tasa" and got it wrong reported it as en error. It's the only way for Duolingo to learn. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espomama
espomama
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Yes, I've reported everything.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScubaDyer

In my part of Mexico I have never heard the word "task." We say "impuesto."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sunnymeader

A previous question translated ¨business people¨ as ¨Hombres de negocios¨. So why is it wrong here? And isn´t ¨empresario¨ closer to ¨entrepreneur¨ in meaning?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pogosticksteve
Pogosticksteve
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Emprendedor is closer to the english meaning of entrepreneur. an "Empresario" is closer to "business owner"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

Seems to me individual business owners are entrepreneurs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FoolOnThePlanet

Hombre de negocios would literally be businessmen not business people.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

What are business people then?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

In many English-speaking cultures, particularly the United States, many empresarias consider it disrespectful to have a male-gender-specific word to describe them. To avoid giving insult, polite people often use the "politically correct," neutral gender word "person" instead of the word "man" as the suffix. So, "businessman" becomes "businessperson," and "businessmen" becomes "businesspeople." Some people add a hyphen to make these words easier to read: business-man and business-people. Some people, like FoolOnThePlanet, leave the hyphen out.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Maybe it will accept "Personas de negocios."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

No such luck!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerrenceRocks

The personal "a" is killing me. Any tips on remembering when to include it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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You use it in front of a direct object (whatever the verb is acting on, basically), when the object is a particular person/people. It's for referring to specific people, or people who've already been identified in the conversation.

It might be easier to think about when you don't use it - when the people you're talking about are a general group or category, so you're not talking about anyone in particular. Busco un amigo means "I'm looking for a friend", but without the personal 'a' it has a generalised feel to it. It basically means "I'm looking for someone out there who'll be my friend", you know? Whereas busco a un amigo means "I'm looking for a specific person who's my friend". The 'a' makes it a concrete person, specific and direct. Notice how in English I had to waffle a lot to explain the specific meaning in each case!

You can think of it as a little bit like the difference between 'a' and 'the' in English - if someone says 'the cat' then it's strongly implied that either you already know which cat is being talked about, or that the speaker at least has a specific cat in mind. 'A cat' is usually like introducing a previously unknown cat, or talking about cats in general. The personal 'a' is sort of a stronger version of this idea of general vs specific. If you have a particular person or people in mind, use it! (And like Eloise says, it works for pets too)

On the direct object thing, this kind of sentence is awkward because of the translation - gustar actually means something like to please, so the more literal translation is "the new tax does not please the businesspeople either". "The businesspeople" is the direct object of the verb please, which is why you put the personal 'a' in there (we're talking about specific people who aren't pleased, remember). The natural translation is "the businesspeople don't like the new tax" which flips the subject/object around and confuses the whole idea. Just remember that with gustar the people doing the 'liking' are the direct object in the Spanish sentence, so there's a good chance a personal 'a' will be in there

e- yikes that's long. Hopefully it helps though, once you get the general idea it actually makes a lot of sense! Then you just forget it and go 'OF COURSE!!!' when you get things wrong ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Excellent comments. Just wanted to add that somewhere in my researches I also read that a personal a can be used before the name of something that is personified, like the name of a ship! This thread is costing me a lot of lingots, as you deserve one as well!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Terrence: Super short answer - whenever a person or pet is a direct object the personal 'a' is used. Even in passive or reflexive sentences. Maybe this will help: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/persa.htm :-) I'm just starting to get used to it, and also distinguishing between the personal 'a' and the preposition 'a'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vickifoss

Why is it "nueva tasa" and not "tasa nueva"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Has anyone else noticed the hover suggestion "gravan" for tax?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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'Gravan' is the verb 'to tax', according to my VOX dictionary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andellmohan
andellmohan
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Yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajfost

Some say tasa, some say impuesto but neither is given as a highlighted option

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tslyter

Can i say "la gente de comercio"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IvanMusorov

How about ejecutivos?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RageHole

Why do you put the adjective before the noun sometimes and behind the noun other times?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Check it:
http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/adjectives_word_order.htm

The short answer is that adjectives after the noun generally identify a particular example of the noun (like 'the red car' tells you which car I mean), but before the noun they stress a general, shared characteristic of the group (like 'the white snow' - snow is white, you're just emphasising that fact). It can be used for emphasis or emotion, or to express a subjective opinion. And because it's additional info, instead of being used to identify a specific example, you could omit it!

It can be down to the speaker, but there are some adjectives where there's a definite change in meaning depending on where you put it, which is what's happening here:
http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/adjective_placement.htm
and a good discussion here in Spanish:
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1936189

Basically noun nuevo means a thing that is brand new, just made, identified by its 'newness'. Nuevo noun means a thing that's 'new to you' if you like. You're really just giving some extra information about the thing, i.e. the fact that you just got it. It's not about the age of the object itself, which is an inherent characteristic, if that makes sense.

As far as this sentence goes I'm not sure, it could be a case of 'the businesspeople don't like the new tax, which is new' as opposed to 'the businesspeople don't like the new tax' (implying they don't have a problem with the others). I wouldn't be surprised if you could stick the nuevo on either side here, since the difference is subtle

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Would that same idea apply to "el gran hombre" being a person whom you think is great? Lingot to you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesrif
julesrif
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tienen mal las definiciones: un IMPUESTO "tax" es una suma de dinero que se le paga a un Estado sin contraprestación directa, una TASA "rate/fee" es una suma de dinero que tiene una contraprestación directa en forma de servicio, o puede referirse a una tasa de interés que se aplica sobre un préstamo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Esto es muy interesante. ¿Es un abrogado? Por favor, ¿por qué es "mal" después "tienen" en su sentencia? Gracias.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesrif
julesrif
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"Tienen (ustedes, Duolingo) mal las definiciones." Otra forma de decirlo es: USTEDES tienen las definiciones MAL.

No soy abogado, estoy estudiando para ser Contador Público.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Gracias. ¿Está Contador Público abreviado a C. P. en Español? Lingot a tu.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesrif
julesrif
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No, se utiliza el prefijo Cr. (Masculino) por ejemplo Cr. Juan Perez

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKing14

This whole sentence looks wrong to me. Where is the negative for "empresarios"? I think the sentence should read like this: Los empresarions no les gusta la nueva tasa tampoco.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Read the comments!

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    No les gusta a los negociantes el nuevo impuesto tampoco. I don't doubt there's an error here, but I'd appreciate someone identifying it for me. TIA.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
    adder3
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    I would like to know as weel. That is what I put

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/robin.west

    I used personas instead of gente. Is that wrong? If so, why?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/17jclela

    I also got marked wrong for putting "personas" in place of "gente." I think to distinguish between the two, "gente" refers to a group of certain people like a race or organization; la gente americana, la gente de negocios. "Personas" would be used for a group of people who probably don't have an organization or race in common, like "Las personas están en el parque para celebrar el cumpleaños de la ciudad" or something like that. But in some cases, "gente" and "personas" are interchangeable. Just be careful. Hope this helps because this was just on the fly. ;)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/caresframa
    caresframa
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    tax es IMPUESTO en español

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/NkosiHenry

    I put tampoco last and got it wrong. Can someone clear up for me why is that?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
    telemetry
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    Did you make the verb negative? With a negative phrase each part needs to be negative, so you need to say no les gusta, unless you're putting tampoco before the verb. So basically:

    A los empresarios tampoco les gusta la nueva tasa.
    A los empresarios no les gusta la nueva tasa tampoco.

    The bits in bold are the negative phrases - the verb can be made negative with tampoco, or you can use no if you're putting tampoco somewhere else like the end. If you put it at the end but didn't add the no, then the verb isn't negative anymore and that breaks the rules!

    More here:
    http://spanish.about.com/od/sentencestructure/a/double_negatives.htm

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/NkosiHenry

    Oh I get it now. I left out the no before les gusta. Your explanation clears up that I needed to negate the verb. Thanks a lot for that. Muchas gracias.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

    This is so helpful; thanks!

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/scottrobertssatx

    Impuesto is tax. No really, look it up

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa255843

    el impuesto is also the word for 'tax'

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/logotha2

    i cant see how it is a negative,is it tampoco that makes the whole sentence negative?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/julia432930

    this is all wrong - an empresario is an entrepeneur rather than a business person - there is a difference and tampoco means neither which would then need a nor and tasa is rate so maybe tasa de impuesto.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Annievlord

    This sentence says they "Like the new tax."

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/loubbles
    loubbles
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    I put a los comerciantes instead of los empresarios, in their short stories they call the business people los comerciantes, and now they don't accept this? I think that they have to check their own stories!

    5 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

    Is it really wrong to put 'tampoco' at the end of this sentence? It was marked wrong 2018-05-12.

    4 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alfanzo58
    Alfanzo58
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    Impusesto why tasa

    2 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Cadano2

    Why is it "a los" empresarios and not just "los empresarios"?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

    Honestly this is TOO counter intuitive I have reached a point where I see this I just screen shot it take whatever the error is, figure it out and get it the next time. Tasa in previous exercises is a generic term for rate not tax

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/BoulderSpanish

    This is a comment for those who feel tricked by new meanings for words or new words for meanings. I started Duolingo about five years ago and at that time the curriculum in Spanish was written by some volunteers who may have been replaced now with newer volunteers. So, some of the vocabulary I learned has been changed and there are new words that I never encountered in my five years here. Things change. Let's get on with it.

    2 days ago