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"Die Lehrerin mag die Erdbeere."

Translation:The teacher likes the strawberry.

5 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/anyabones
anyabonesPlus
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okay, so Lehrer is a male teacher, Lehrerin is female teacher? is that right? then what is plural teachers?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
christian
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5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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It gets ugly if you have a mixed gendered plural. Normal people choose the plural die Lehrer (as the male). Politically correct people might get creative with things like LehrerInnen (with a capital I in the middle), Lehrer_innen (to show that there is room for difference in betweeen - no joke) or recently a university just decided to always use the female version when ambigious. I don't encourage anyone to do that. Just don't be surprised if you stumble across something like that.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coldsilver87

I would assume that most people would use der Leher und die Lehrerinnen to represent a mixed group of teachers.

Is that common? What are young people using now in their daily speeches to indicate a mixed group of people?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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People try to be efficient. You will not use three words where one can do. So while talking about teachers, you will say "die Lehrer" for a mixed staff and "die Lehrerinnen" for an all female staff. The shorter male version is always used for the mixed group, and no political campaign will change that behaviour. Only in an official speech you will address them separately: "Liebe Lehrerinnen und Lehrer!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RavynLoony
RavynLoony
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What is the plural of strawberry?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Strawberries - Erdbeeren

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.stratton
m.stratton
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Thanks, I came here for that answer too! Also, very impressive streak! 260!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RavynLoony
RavynLoony
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Danke!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmattson
jackmattson
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Ah scheiße!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/godzillachomps

If "Der Lehrer mag die Erdbeeren" is not correct, how would you say the teacher likes the "strawberrie(S)'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aurora-Keith

It looked like a tense for direct object to me

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eplus17

"die Erdberre" is indeed the direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sajidur

What is the difference between Lehrer and Lehrerin? And Artz and Artzin?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Lehrerin and Ärztin are a female teacher/ a female doctor. Lehrer and Arzt are the male and generic terms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sajidur

Thanks for the clarification :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreas_Sterben

"The schoolmistress" isn't a valid translation for "Die Lehrerin"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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If you think it is correct, report it as a valid translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Sapphira-
-Sapphira-
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I am confused about the pronunciation of "Erdbeere". Can someone help me please? Many thanks! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drub10
Drub10
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Why does "the" have to be in front of "strawberries?" In (American) English plenty of people would say, "The teacher likes strawberries." Unless there are choices of different fruits, and the teacher only likes the strawberries, then it would be good as, "The teacher likes the strawberries."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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This sentence does not contain the word "strawberries", but rather the singular, "strawberry".

And as you point out, both "strawberries" and "the strawberries" are grammatically correct, and mean slightly different things -- both may show up in Duolingo exercises, and have to be translated appropriately into the equivalent German expressions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nick.prate

Mögen makes the subject dativ, does it not? Shouldn't it be Der

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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No. And I don't think that there are any verbs in German that have a dative subject (unlike, say, in Icelandic).

Perhaps you are thinking about verbs such as gefallen where the experiencer is in the dative case, e.g. mir gefällt das Buch "I like the book", but there the subject is das Buch and that is in the nominative case, like all subjects in German. A more literal translation would be "The book appeals to me".

8 months ago