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"I am a free man."

Translation:Soy un hombre libre.

5 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/stoneystone

Why 'soy'? I doubt an incarcerated man would consider himself forever free.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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I think the free here is descriptive, about his personality. He's a free man that free from the stereotypes of things set by society or that sorts of things, thus ser

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenoraFlood

In the philosophical sense of the phrase, Soy fits, but I think estoy makes much more sense in general. Also, estoy was used in a different sentence regarding freedom. I'm going to report it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmst3

I'm with you. Doesn't seem a permanent state to me...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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I guess it means freedom is a part of him now, rather than his state.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I choose "estoy". Freedom is not a guarantee, but a variable. (Both ser & estar should be accepted.) We have no context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

The rule about permanence isn't perfect though. I've heard it described this way though. Estar is regarding a state of being. HOW one is, etc. Ser is who one IS. So things that are 'permanent' or long term. Jobs, places you live, freedom!, etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hayolie
hayolie
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¡No soy un número, soy un hombre libre!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/synp
synp
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Vine aquí buscando esto

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MinombreesDJ

I am so frustrated. The last time I put the adjective after "hombre" I got it wrong! So, learning from my mistake, this time I placed the adjective before it--and got it wrong! Do some adjectives belong before the noun and some after?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geodynamical

I would also like some more help discerning whether to put adjectives before or after nouns in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackstewart2

This doesn't fully answer your question, but I think of "hombre grande" to mean big man, and "gran hombre" to mean great man. That's one difference, but it doesn't address other modifiers. It does seem that there are some situations where putting the modifier in front seems to be okay. Don't know the rule for that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeccaCowell647

I found this helpful in understanding adjective placement http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/whereadjective.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpetrillo3

What is the different between "soy" and "estoy" ??

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stfods
stfods
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Soy would reflect permanent state of freedom while Estoy would address temporary state of freedom. So it would depend on the context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IforGot2
IforGot2
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Libre hombre should be right no? Like a state of mind for emphasis...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suezq
suezq
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Spanish speakers, why 'no estoy libre' but 'soy hombre libre' Please?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelPere71423

You would say 'estoy libre' after stepping out of jail, or if you previously weren't free. 'Soy libre' means you are free by definition, as in I am a free spirit, or you are someone who exercises personal freedom consistently.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackstewart2

This is a sentence where either estoy or soy should be acceptable. Soy would be appropriate where someone lives in freedom and estoy where they just got their freedom. Have submitted to DuoLingo that estoy should be acceptable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingolizard
Lingolizard
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Why not "estoy"? Especially considering that "no estoy libre" is suggested as a translation for "I am not free" in another sentence ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

I think this could show an instance of "conditional" rather than "essential," to one's being: if a person was asked to participate in an event but had a previous obligation, he could decline the invitation by saying, "No, no estoy libre eso día." (Correct my weak Spanish skills if that does not say, correctly, "No, I am not free that day.") Then the ser form of "to be," would be used for stating the essential free nature of mankind, not meant to be enslaved or owned by another man.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Desdichado_

Gordon Librehombre

1 year ago