"Mi padre sabe nadar."

Translation:My father can swim.

5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/arturohiero

Bad translation. It should be "My father knows how to swim". My father can swim is "Mi padre puede nadar".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroQuil
MauroQuil
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One sentence perfectly translates the idea expressed in the other. "Mi padre puede nadar" is not wrong at all, but it would be something you would say if he had only one leg and people wondered whether he is capable to swim with his handicap, not whether he is learned in the art or not. Now imagine a boy sees his father fall from a boat on calm waters and, while everyone panics, he is very calm. If he were an english speaker he would certainly say "Don't worry, my father can swim". If he were as spanish speaker what would he say? 'No te preocupes, mi padre sabe nadar.', most likely

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenTurner93

I agree the meaning is so close as to make no difference in this example, but they're still two different words that correspond (I'm not very knowledgeable about this but I'm inclined to say perfectly) between Spanish and English. Using one when you mean another, even if it doesn't affect overall meaning, is still incorrect. You can't say sabe in Spanish and mean can in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroQuil
MauroQuil
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Well, what we should learn from this, it seems, is that the most usual way of saying "he can swim" (in general, not specifying distance, clothing, phisical or water conditions) in Spanish would be "él sabe nadar" not "él puede nadar". The best translation of a sentence is not always using the best translation for each word. I would just like to have a native speaker confirm that "mi padre puede nadar", has a more specific meaning in in Spanish, as in "My father is ready for swiming". When someone says "I can´t swim" in English you will usually assume he/she never learned to swim, that he doesn´t know how to swim. Not that he is cold or that he is, at this moment, incapable of swimming. The same goes for "I can´t read"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenTurner93

Yeah sure, I'm not at all a native but I've got a link that might help. Saber is a way of expressing the possession of a skill and Poder of a possibility or inclination http://www.aulahispanica.com/node/122. "Mi padre puede nadar" means that my dad has the opportunity to swim, not that he knows how to, which makes the crossing of lines in meaning here irritating.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroQuil
MauroQuil
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Agreed, and it were the English, not the Spanish who crossed that line ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

Im wondering if puede is more like may not can?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShubhamMis325844

How it can be sabe man,,, Sabe is 'to know'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pannekaken
Pannekaken
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This is how you usually say "my father can swim" in Spanish. It's not a bad translation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/limenchilli

i was marked wrong previously when i translated sabemos nadar as "we can swim"!! so not fair!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ange.guzma

I am a Spanish native and at least with people that are native, we talk like that. To say "Mi padre sabe nadar" that's very common but Offcourse there are a lot of synonyms like: "Mi padre puede nadar"; "Mi padre aprendió a nadar"... And all this you can add with the context. But one detail, we say "Mi papá" or "Mi papi" like in English: "My dad" or "My daddy" but it differs from one person to another ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irisnijboer

Would "mi padre puede nadar" be wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Age_of_Nemesis
Age_of_Nemesis
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I do not believe so; if it's marked as such, you should probably report it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekampel

I put my father knows to swim and it marked it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s4chao
s4chao
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Can someone explain why "My father knows to swim" is wrong? How do we distinguish it from "My father knows how to swim"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

Both are correct translations of "Mi padre sabe nadar. Saber is not only translated as "to know", but also as "to know how." When placed before an action verb, the translation of "saber" MOST OFTEN becomes "to know how" to do whatever the verb is describing. So, when translating "Mi padre sabe nadar." - saber = to know how; nadar = to swim. Context can change that. I think Duo is reacting to the most common meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s4chao
s4chao
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Can someone explain why "My father knows to swim" is wrong? How do we distinguish it from "My father knows how to swim"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andiness1

In this instance it relies on English grammar. "My father knows to swim" isn't really a grammatically correct sentence unless it's a shortened form of "My father knows he has to swim." In this case it's referring to an ability, so to make sense in English it has to be "My father knows how to swim."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcrdpisc

I would think that they are trying to teach the different words and there meanings. It would not be wrong to say Mi padre puede nadar o mi padre sabe nadar just as it isn't wrong in English. However, poder and saber are two different words that can have similar meanings depending on the usage. Again, the point I think is to make sure that one knows the difference in meaning between the two so that when saber appears we translate it as "to know" and not "to be able."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ambiemercedes

I got the sentence correct, with "My father can swim". On a different sentence, "Yo se leer.", I typed, "I can read" and it was wrong. I had to type "I know how to read." Aren't these kind of the same use of saber, where in English we say, "he, she, I - can" meaning someone understands how to do something. Hope I am making sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theRealRabbit

"My father knows swimming" is a better translation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hunter52981

I put down "My papa knows how to swim." It said it was incorrect; it should be correct. I reported it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adriennesls

So if you wanted to say "my father knows nothing" what would it be?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelkin
Zelkin
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bwaaaaaaaa!?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenore322681

I read the Spanish sentence too quickly and instead of the correct translation wrote: "My father knows nothing." Needless to say, I both got it wrong and thought for a moment that Duolingo has no respect for its parents. XD

11 months ago
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