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"Ella me ha obligado a caminar."

Translation:She has forced me to walk.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LGh
LGh
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Obligar: to force, to obligate, to oblige => "She has obliged me to walk" should be a perfectly correct sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma

obliged was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineCu976268

not for me, it wasn't. Huh.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leolechat

no, not accepted any more!!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

Although it sounds somewhat awkward, I agree that it should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"She has required me to walk" was also accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diliondani
diliondani
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Why is the 'a' necessary? Caminar already means 'to walk'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep-a.html

This site has more lists of the prepositions that follow specific verbs in Spanish. I think that memorization is the obvious way to master this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

Now I better understand the Portuguese, "Obrigado," (thank you)!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LDuo1234

Grammatically, why is there an "a" before caminar?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xeno03

I think this is one of those Linked Verbs that uses "a" before putting another verb (infinitive) Please someone correct me if i'm wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello LDuo1234: I think it accompanies obligado rather than caminar.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

... and all I wanted to do was run!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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So true, HC. I can still hear the teacher's voice echoing down the corridor "DON'T RUN!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlbertusMinimus

"She has obliged me to walk" should be accepted, but it wasn't for me. I reported it.

It's not super common in English, but it is perfectly acceptable, especially if you're speaking in a formal tone. It's also is less negative. Being obliged is less forceful and negative than being forced or made to do something.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Both should be accepted. However, my impression is that the Spanish obligar is usually more forceful and means force, compel, or make somebody do something.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johntdp

I agree. She has forced me to walk would not commonly be said.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

"She's forced me to walk to school, day after day!" That doesn't sound bizarre to me. Maybe what sounds weird to you is simply the fact that the contraction "She's" has been expanded to "She is."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taylor_XD

When is it correct to use "me" or "mi". It seems to get me all the time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Taylor, "me" is a direct object pronoun; mi without an accent is a possessive adjective: mi libro, mi novio; mí with an accent is a prepositional object pronoun: para mí, sin mí, después de mí, a mí...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taylor_XD

Thanks Melita2. This site has been very helpful and I am thankful to nice people like you answering questions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

You are quite welcome - you made my day!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

I left out "has" on purpose this time to see what would happen. I wrote, "She forced me to walk". It was accepted as correct. Does someone know why this wouldn't need the preterite form of the verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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Because the person that has been forced into walking is still walking. Preterite would suggest she forced me to walk but that walking has now finished.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnowley
jnowley
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I agree, I think She has obliged me to walk works

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Ella tomó mi llaves del coche

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay.Ey
Jay.Ey
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Literally, true, but I can't imagine anyone talking like that. Come to think of it, "She has forced me to walk" seems like it needs to include a time to make sense (e.g., "She has forced me to walk in the past.") Otherwise, a better translation would be "She made me walk" or "She forced me to walk," IMO.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juandenil
juandenil
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' She made me walk '. Duolingo accused me of leaving a word out, but English can be wonderfully succinct .

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

"She made me walk" is in the simple past tense, but this activity is all about teaching you how to use the past perfect tense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

Good! But Duo probably wanted it to be 'She's made me walk."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

NO! "Made" is past (preterite, preterito) tense. Duo wanted you to practice "present perfect", i.e. "he, has, ha obligado." http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfect.html

Take a look at what section of Duo this is in: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/es/Verbs%3A-Present-Perfect/practice

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

But Duo does accept "She has made me walk."

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John675279

Choices one and three are identical.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmgraf

compelled = obliged - neither is common in English - but synonyms should be accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrickfar9

I wrongly thought 'compelled' would be a good translation of obligado.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott5940

If "She has bound me to walk." then why does Duo suggest "bound" as a translation for obligado? also "bound" can mean oblige or obliged.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1Plus
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For the verb obligar, the binding seems to be about legal obligations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott5940

Gracias elissaf1

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Shouldn't this be in subjunctive? Viz.: Ella ha obligado que yo camine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ktsnoddy

I'm just curious- what about "She has allowed me to walk"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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ella me ha permitido caminar / ella me ha dejado caminar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruthgrace00
ruthgrace00
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Then you would use the verb 'permitir'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yipivan
yipivan
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Why do I need "a" between "obligado" and "caminar"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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In Spanish, many verbs must be followed by a preposition, which may or may not correspond to the preposition (if any) used in English. The following is a list of Spanish verbs which require a when followed by an infinitive. http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep-a.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KungLaotheAlumni

This may be more of an English grammar question, but could you not say "She has made me to walk?" DL said that " She has made me walk" or "She has forced me to walk" are good, but it did not take my answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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That's a great question KLA, and I can't think of a logical answer.

After we have considered the rules of grammar we generally fall back on the question: "Does it sound right?' In this case my only answer is that sometimes we use "to" and sometimes we don't.
So "She has forced me to walk", "She has required me to walk", "She has allowed me to walk" all sound OK, but we would say "She has made me walk". "She has made me to walk" just sounds wrong.

It seems to be just the way language has evolved. Let me draw your attention to the 23rd Psalm.

In the King James version of the christian bible (written around the end of the 16th Century) it starts:

"The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He maketh me to lie down in green pastures;"

By the time we get to the Modern English Version (from the second half of the 20th Century) it goes:

"The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He makes me lie down in green pastures;"

So "maketh" has changed to "makes" and the "to" has disappeared. Is there any logic working here? If there is, I can't find it!

I can only suggest that, when you put the words in your vocabulary notebook, you can write: "to force to", "to require to", and "to allow to", but you should write: "to make (NOT to make to!!!)".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"She has made me to walk" simply is wrong in English.
"She has forced me to walk" is, however, good English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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What you say is true, but it isn't simple!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I agree. I was falling back on your early observation, "does it sound right?" Also, as you might say both Spanish and English have evolved standard idioms, or ways of saying, which are not necessarily logical -- except possibly from an historical standpoint.

Beginning early in the 20th century, philosophers of language and science tried to make science talk, and science, purely logical (in the sense that math is logical). . By the end of the century, they realized that was not possible.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Language can be a somewhat blunt instrument when we need to communicate ideas with precision. In my former career as a scientist, I had on occasion to apply some linguistic gymnastics to write accurate reports without tripping up over unintended ambiguity and mis-representation.

In Animal Farm, George Orwell famously satirised the way language could be manipulated in order to deliberately mis-lead and confuse. [ I might suggest that all languages are equal, but some are more equal than others! :-) ]
And in his much blacker comedy 1984, Orwell had his characters continually re-writing the dictionaries and other reference books (and destroying all previous issues) in order to meet the latest aims of the ruling classes.

Of course this could never happen in real life, otherwise we might (as a purely imaginary example) have politicians refusing to call their country's perceived enemies "prisoners-of-war" in order to avoid their obligations under The Third Geneva Convention. Yes, a ridiculous notion indeed!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lumpy_the_Great

I always have trouble with this sort of sentence structure. The subject and object right next to each other just seems weird to my ears.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Are you talking about the English or the Spanish? The English does not have an object right nest to the subject. The Spanish has a subject and indirect object juxtaposed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lumpy_the_Great

Sorry, I am an engineer, not an English or linguistic major, I sometimes get the words wrong. In English this would be the same thing if you said "I she had obliged to walk" Which, of course, you wouldn't say in English. So having the "Ella" right next to the "me" is odd to my eyes and ears.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileenGonz14

A Haiku Entitled: An ode to Perfection

I forgot a word. Brain farts are indeed still wrong. ::Sighs:: I just can't win.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stsmith50

I used obliged and it was marked wrong???????

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jas0nm0
jas0nm0
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she has obligated me to walk is not accepted as of 12FEB2018. Reported.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter858504

I have just had obliged rejected and told the correct word is obligated. Obligated sounds crazy in this context

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JudgeHill

"She has obliged me to walk" was not accepted today (Sept 2018). I have reported it

2 weeks ago