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"Welk programma volg jij?"

Translation:Which program are you taking?

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Egcha
Egcha
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Is there a reason why "which program do you follow" is not accepted as a translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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Surely it should be accepted. I have reported this as an error.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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I will not bother to report, since you already have. But to me, if you are going to translate "programma" literally as: (programme/program), when the more natural English expression in this context would be: "course", then a literal translation of "volgt" should also be accepted. Although a more common expression would be: "take a course", you can certainly "follow a programme" too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supernova155

Course would be "cursus" in Dutch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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but it has not been corrected yet (6/1/15)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diegocambuy

accepted now. (29 /June /2015)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lanithes
LanithesPlus
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It is, if you spell it as programme :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trixy-la-Louve
Trixy-la-LouvePlus
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What does "programma" mean in the Dutch education system?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Programma is not really a common word in relation to the education system, although you can come across it sometimes. Without context, I would expect this sentence to be about a television show (televisieprogramma). Next to that you can come across programma in the meaning of het programma van de avond (the progam/agenda of the evening), het theaterprogramma (the theatre show) and het programmaboekje (program booklet of whatever is planned: football match, festival, wedding party).

And the common question: Wat staat er op het programma? (What is the plan?/What can I expect for today/this holiday/this course/etc?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trixy-la-Louve
Trixy-la-LouvePlus
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But if this sentence is in the education tree, what can it refer to? Is it about a set of matters someone is studying? Is it a university thing?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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That would be the most likely meaning indeed. But as I said it's not used commonly, so usage will depend on individual schools/universities. Since university has the most choice of subjects within a studies, I guess one is most likely to come across it there. But then there also are some secondary schools (where 12 to 18 year olds go to) that have a special program for (potential) top athletes, for that kind of thing, programma is probably used as well.

Also programma is not used for the specialisation within a studies, that is afstudeerrichting, literally graduation direction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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can it be translated as syllabus?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I don't think so. But I'm probably not the best person to ask, after looking into it and looking up some things, I'm still not sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

I would really like someone at Duolingo to answer this. Neither Van Dale or Wikipedia (in Dutch) have any reference to programma as being a word to do with education.

It is certainly not one which I am familiar with in the UK (unless things have changed significantly in the past few years). There you would follow a course or a syllabus, achieve a key stage, take a subject, study for a qualification, do an apprenticeship...

Can someone from Duolingo explain what this is doing in the education section?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcarlosmjr
jcarlosmjr
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Does the sentence you gave apply only to an academic sense? Or can we use it in a daily conversation, something like "What are the plans for today?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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It can apply to any situation where one person or group has arranged something for others so e.g. education, holiday, day trip, a town's King's day celebration, (bachelor) party, you name it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koos42

Why not, "which program are you in?"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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Whether "which program are you in?" is a good translation depends on what "programma" means in this education context. As I mentioned in a comment in a different discussion, if it's like an academic program in the US, then being in that program would be preferable. "I'm in the Medieval studies program."

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joerg9
Joerg9
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Isn't it possible "to attend" a course? Or is it not possible in this context?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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I'm not sure if you're asking about the English, or the Dutch. To my mind, "to attend a course" is perfectly good English, but not an accurate reflection of what (I think!) the original Dutch is saying. It says nothing about "attending", so hypothetically could be an online or distance-learning course. It seems to be asking more about the structure or content.

Also, if it's talking about degree level education, or similar, I'm not sure I would use the phrase: "attending a course" (even if you do physically attend). I would usually use "attending a course" only for a short course of a few days, or (at most) a few weeks. Similar to "attending a conference". I would find it a bit odd if someone who had committed to several years of study described it as simply "attending a course".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joerg9
Joerg9
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Thanks Tina, that is exactly what I want to know.

2 years ago