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  5. "An bhean bhándearg."

"An bhean bhándearg."

Translation:The pink woman.

October 27, 2014

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Speledro

...is my favourite variety of apple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

"The pink lady" was accepted for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fluttershy937702

how in the world are you learning all those languages????????????????????????????????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

Awesome, so pink is called "whitered" in Irish. I love this kind of logical and easy to remember words. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

As in "white", "whiter", "whitest", "whitered"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

Looks like the pink girls grew up. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gia758609

sigh They grow up so fast... :-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faol

How come "bhean" begins with a "V" sound and "bhándearg" with a "W"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Because in this speakers dialect, they differentiate between a broad bh (bho, with a "w" sound) and slender bh (bhe with a "v" sound).

In Munster Irish bh has a "v" sound for both broad and slender


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grainemhaol

Really helpful - thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faol

Thank you! (...Incidentally, which dialect is being spoken here?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

The consensus is that the current speaker is from North Connacht. So she sometimes uses spoken forms that don't reflect the written standard that Duolingo is teaching.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacey773203

And in Donegal Irish, it seems that almost everything is a W sound. Arg!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.Hilary

Knocksedan. Le do thoil! That was my question, too!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niamhwitch

Why is bándearg lenited (to bhándearg)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1831

Because bean is a feminine noun, and adjectives following feminine singular nouns are lenited.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack40822

Why is bean "lenited" to bhean? I will admit, I have never heard the term lenition until I started using this site, so I would be happy if you could explain it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1831

Singular feminine nouns in the nominative case are lenited after the definite article. I'm not aware of any particular reason for this, it's just how things are done in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelleplus8

I don't understand what nominative case means. I looked it up on Wikipedia, and there were examples, but no examples of sentences that were NOT in the nominative case, so I couldn't pinpoint what was special about them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Sentences aren’t in a particular case; nouns, pronouns, and adjectives can be. For example, “he” is in the nominative case, but “him” is in either the accusative case or the dative case. A noun or pronoun in the nominative case usually indicates the subject of a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1831

In Irish, nominative basically means that it is not genitive or vocative (so not possessing/modifying another noun or being directly addressed) and also not the object of a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreasaWilson

it means its the subject of the sentence. In a full sentence with a verb the person doing the verb would be nominative as it "The pink woman eats an apple".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

It makes the language flow better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

The best way I have found to think about this, and especially to explain it to people who aren't used to grammatical gender, is this: "feminine" nouns are the ones that lenite after a definite article. Just like in French, "feminine" nouns are the ones that take "la".

Don't try to think of it as a quality of the thing the noun describes, or of the phonetics or spelling of it - just know that there are X classes of nouns in a given language, and each one follows certain consistent rules.

You don't hear people asking "but WHY is this verb in conjugation group 4?", but as soon as you label noun classes with a descriptor like "masculine" it sounds like there's a deeper meaning behind it. Sometimes there is, sometimes there isn't, but it's hardly ever a question that's going to make learning the language easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The historical reason for lenition (and the other initial mutations) can be found here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonMurray29

If you learned irish in school, you were probably told like me that the word takes a séimhiú (shae_voo), which means the same as 'the word is lenited'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kletter1

Sherlock anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijahs_1995

I was thinking that too. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmBrave16

.... Talking about Sherlock.... have you watched Series 4 episode 3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

Wikipedia says "á" should always be pronounced [ɑː], but she is pronouncing [oʊ]. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

-Comment edited upon new speaker-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshuaburrow

Is this the same woman that's in the fridge with Paul?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris346815

Nah, the one in the fridge is "an bhean ghorm". ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fluttershy937702

first “the red woman” then “the pink woman”

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