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"Las siguientes semanas"

Translation:The following weeks

1
5 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nameloc3

The "g" seems completely silent here (and on Google translate) giving the word only three syllables. How do you know if the "g" is silent or pronounced, like in "gato"?

21
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inndem

It's not silent - it's just an approximant. If you're a native English speaker, you might pronounce the word "stagnate" with it. Think of it as a lazy G, one where you don't actually release a hard G sound. Your tongue approaches the usual G position in your mouth but then you just move on to the next sound instead of finishing it. In Spanish, most Gs are approximants like that. Except when they come after a pause/at the beginning of an utterance and after nasal sounds (n, m). Spanish speakers aren't entirely aware of this and they will pronounce a hard G sound in very careful speech, though (e.g. if you ask them how to pronounce a word with a G in the middle like "segura").

170
Reply274 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/megustamivida

I love this comment. I wish more nuanced explanations like this existed throughout the discussions! Thank you.

33
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synesthete24

Thank you! It keeps sounding like, I don't know, "sientes".

9
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
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English speakers are not always aware of how they speak either - I have heard someone say, "I always pronounce the "l" in "palm" - and pronouncing "palm" as "pom" when he said it!

9
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rliora

Thank you very much for so good explanation!

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex.Essilfie
Alex.Essilfie
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Thanks for the explanation.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

thanks for the explanation

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erick667072

+51973363578 My WhatsApp. I'm peruvian. I speak English and Spanish

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Twentys1x

G can be silent, G can be Guh, G can be Hey. As you learn more spanish you will just kind of get a feel for when to use the appropriate one. It has to do with what letters are also included in the syllable.

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

The word is still only 3 syllables, though. si-guien-te. And inndem is very correct in his explanation. It is basically precisely what I was going to say. The University of Iowa has a great website that breaks down Spanish phonetics and gives sound and illustration examples.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Siguiente reminds me of the word, sequence.

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John.Red

Is there any difference between "Las siguientes semanas" and "Las semanas proximas"?

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrLoewe

From what I remember from watching a ridiculous amount of Univision when I worked with a bunch of Mexicans, "la próxima semana" is next week, but "la siguiente semana" is the following week. The difference is subtle, but if I wanted to say that I'm going to do something 7 days from now, I would use próxima. If I wanted to say that something happened 7 days last Christmas, I would use siguente.
It's probably the same as the English words "next" and "following."

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddierc

It sounds like it says sientes not siguientes.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrLoewe

The user inndem above explains well why you might hear it this way. The Spanish G is not often as strong as it is in English. Sometimes it ends up just being a hiss of air over the back of the tongue.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikeattack

I agree!!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/POKERCHICC

Why wouldn't it be Las semanas siguientes? Doesn't the noun or object come before the adjective?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This http://www.italki.com/question/253881 says "Adjectives used to determine the position in a sequence are used before the noun: primero, segundo, siguiente, nuevo." I couldn't find a more "official" reference for this rule.

5
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chamkids

why is the weeks following wrong?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skatelites

what's the difference between 'siguientes semanas' or 'semanas siguientes"? it seems that putting the adjective first normally changes the meaning slightly?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aditina
Aditina
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In this case the meaning doesn't change

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelAngelov

Could "las semanas siguientes" work aswell?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

it would be unlikely that you would ever come across it as it may be grammatically incorrect but I don't know weather it is or not

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JellyBeanRacer

I think it's easier to remember "siguientes" to mean "subsequent" rather than "following."

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josie70136

isn't the adjective supposed to come after the noun?

1
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raedhoy

Why is this not "the following weeks?"

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It is translated as "the following weeks" in the question I just got.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

reedhoy: It is. See above, top of page. Translation: The following weeks

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

yes it is in my one

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

Is there a reason we cannot use the upcoming? Is there a difference in Spanish between the following and the upcoming?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Upcoming" seems way better than "following". For me, the only way "following" seems right is if it is is followed by a list of weeks.

I was at home during the following weeks: May 2-6, Jun 5-9, and July 14-18.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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I would interpret it as the weeks following some previously mentioned event. As in: "Last October I broke my foot. I was unable to walk for the following weeks." Upcoming, on the other hand, only works with reference to the present.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Very good point. And I see that "upcoming" translates as "próximo".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

upcoming is different to following because following is referring to something that happened after something in the past while upcoming is talking about the future so completely different tenses

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichealKennedy

How do you pronounce "siguientes"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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IPA: /siˈɰjen.tes/, I think maybe like /sig-yen-tehs/?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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More or less, but with a soft 'g' that isn't used in English, so it can't really be transliterated accurately without using IPA.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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see gee EN tace, with the g as in get, and tace to rhyme with pace.

You can hear individual words by clicking on the turtle. Or by typing the word into google translate and clicking on the sound button in the bottom right.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

Please stop using google translate. the Spanish e will never be comparable to the a in pace. It is EH. See-gehn-tehs is how you would pronounce the word, without having the use of a phonetics keyboard. The G is a hard g (albeit very weak, in Spanish) and the T is closer to TH with the tongue touching the back of the teeth (interdental). If you pronounce that last e as -ay-, you will be embarrassing yourself.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Google translate is actually pretty good for pronunciation. Just don't rely on it for translations.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

You are absolutely right about translations , I just have not ever used it for pronunciation. But I was basing that off the above user describing the pronunciation,which was not correct but also not a very good phonetic representation anyway, so that is probably my bad. I should check it out. Thanks mrbennet!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

yes my Spanish teacher doesn't want us using google translate

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PupherFish

Remembering how to spell following is going to succck

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lexy0202
lexy0202
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Could this be translated as "the coming weeks"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

no because again it changes the tense which can change the word completely

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

What? What tense is changed? I believe this can be interpreted as the following weeks or the coming weeks, and there's not really much difference. For direct translation purposes, the word "coming" is not present, but as far as getting the gist and meaning of the phrase, I would use either.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It's not the tense, but the period of time it's referring to. When we say "the following weeks", we're talking about the weeks following some time in the past, say the weeks following January 1 of last year. When we say "the coming weeks", we're talking about the weeks following today.

"Las siguente semanas" means "the following weeks". "Las próximas semanas" means the coming weeks.

I guess we might say "today and the following weeks", but I don't think we'd ever say "last January 1 and the coming weeks".

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

the coming is the future tense and the following weeks is referring to something in the past

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jesseress

So, given the same meaning in english, what is the difference in the denotation and connotation that would make "the upcoming weeks" incorrect.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjllo

Why is it las

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Because 'semanas' is plural and feminine.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/19631123

why can't this be the sequential weeks?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gregoryje

Couldnt this also be translated as, "the weeks following" ?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

not this particular phrase as hat would change the order of the sentence but if it was Las semanas siguientes then it would be translated as the weeks following but that would not usually be like this ( if you want the reason go to barbaramorris's comment

1
Reply2 years ago