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  5. "I ragazzi bevono l'acqua."

"I ragazzi bevono l'acqua."

Translation:The boys drink water.

June 23, 2013

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/einsteinbrain

what is the difference between(gli) and (I)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wang.yibo

Thanks! It's really help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samuelzac

Thanks. This was helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MidoMaster

Very helpful thx :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lKl61

it is very good thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suekamel

We put (GLI)before the plural which begins with vowel or s+consonant ,gn,ps ,x and y,on the hand, we put (I) before the plural which begins with consonant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntheaMagr1

Gli is used in front of s+consonant, gn, ps or z. L is used in front of a word starting with a vowel. Hope it helped :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

You're omitting some key information there, and your answer is very misleading. Gli is a plural and l' is a singular. This link has a pretty comprehensive explanation: http://italian.about.com/od/grammar/a/italian-definite-article-forms.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miss.oreochick

Thanks !! It help alot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asheir16

Ok ragazzo is boy - singular? Ragazzi is boys - plural? Ragazza is girl - singular? Ragazze is girls - plural? I DONT KNOW.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TravisStic

Why say l'acqua when it should just be acqua? Is this a cultural thing? There should be a, "further studies" option in the app that goes to something like wiktionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanMontauk

I think it is a language thing. It is the same in French. They might say that English has lost the word "the' when it should be there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graciebarbeau

i find it hard to distinguish il and I. how are they different from gli???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpsciarr

Singular Masculine: lo is for masculine singular nouns where the noun starts with "s+consonant" or a "z" il is for all other masculine singular nouns starting with a consonant. l' is used for masculine singular nouns starting with a vowel

Singular Feminine: la is for feminine singular nouns beginning with any consonant l' is for feminine singular nouns beginning with a vowel

Plural Masculine: gli is for masculine plural nouns where the noun starts with "s+consonant" or a "z". It is also used before masculine nouns starting with a vowel. i is for all other masculine plural nouns starting with a consonant

Plural Feminine: le is for any feminine plural noun

Reference: http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare110a.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salamander_2003

You are literally describing what I'm saying!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraciellaDisney

Couldn't it be "The boy drinks the water"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

In cases like this, Italian uses the definite article differently than English does. In English, we omit "the" for the general case and include it to specify one instance. In Italian, it's the other way around. They use "the" for the general case and omit it to specify one instance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msaradj

can i use l ragazzi bevono acqua?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

It doesn't quite mean the same thing.

In English, when we say "You drink the water" we are talking about a specific case. It's particular water you are drinking. It's the water that someone just gave you. It's the water you've been carrying around with you. When we say "You drink water" we're making a more general statement about your habits.

In Italian it's the other way around. For a specific case it's "Bevi acqua" and for general habits it's "Bevi l'acqua".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diane326947

Why isnt l'acqua the water in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Different grammar rules.

In this case, Italian uses "the" differently than English does.

General case:
The boys drink water.
I ragazzi bevono l'acqua.

Specific instance:
The boys drink the water.
I ragazzi bevono acqua.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorriganAd1

Im confused, it said "l'acqua" so i answered "the water" because "l'" is supposed to be "the" if im correct, but it marked me wrong for saying "the." Can someone please explain how it was wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Because translation is about usage, not word-for-word substitution. Italian and English use the definite article differently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucerito051

Ragazzi meams girls no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nks_ind

Nope it means boys


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinciusnicacio

Ragazze means girls.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorenzoLM

ragazzi masculine plural boys (also for boys and girls)

ragazze feminine plural just girls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcontreras08

ragazzi=boys ragazze=girls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadAsad

I need examples for (gli) and (i) please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmh66

pay attention Gli is used before masculine nouns beginning with a vowel like :Gli uomini,gli italiani but I is used before masculine nouns beginning with consonants: I ragazzi , i giapponesi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KadeDeLacy

Why isn't there a the in the other translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alkimeer

Just so that you know, 'ragazzi' can also mean 'guys' (in plural noun uses) instead of 'boys', 'children' and 'kids'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiesbethMulder

In some exercises l' is left out in the translation if the sentence states water instead of the water and in some exercises you have to add l'. I would say that you need to add it when you need to translate the water and leave it out when translating water?.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

The way it was explained to me, Italian uses the definite article the opposite way English does in sentences like this.

In English, when we're talking about a specific instance, we use "the"--

  • I drink the water = I drink specific water in a specific situation.

We don't use "the" when we're talking about general tendencies and habits--

  • I drink water = I am in the habit of drinking water

In Italian, so I'm told, they do the opposite. They use "the" for general tendencies and habits and leave out "the" when talking about a specific instance--

  • I drink the water = Bevo acqua
  • I drink water = Bevo l'acqua

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbusch

Is the "i" in "i ragazzi" only for masculine plural form? Is there a feminine version of "i" for "ragazze?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnovinc
  • il ragazzo (the boy) / i ragazzi (the boys)
  • la ragazza (the girl) / le ragazze (the girls)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/urielfs

could be corret the il ragazzi for the plural form too:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rodri47

No, it can only be i


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abby_Hoffman

Is the 'I' in this sentance in i or and L? Help appreciated. I get confused with all the 'ils' and 'als' and 'i's


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garypierre18

How am I going to know if Ragazzi is plural or singular . should I add S at then end or ...... what ?

I am a beginner ! thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

There are a small handful of exceptions, but Italian is fairly regular.

For most nouns, if it ends in -o then it's masculine and singular. To make it plural, change the -o to -i.
il ragazzo = the boy
i ragazzi = the boys

If it ends in -a then it's feminine and singular. To make it plural, change the -a to -e.
la ragazza = the girl
le ragazze = the girls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorriganAd1

Ragazzi=boys; ragazzo=boy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KOTH_Krunch

God, I love how everything flows in Italian. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

Why doesn't it accept "I ragazzi bevono acqua"? Does leaving out the "il" which becomes (l') before "acqua" fundamentally change the plurality of water? I assumed "acqua" could be used as a countless noun for water, the same way English does with almost all liquids.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Italian handles the definite article a little differently than English does. Omitting the definite article means it's a specific case and using the definite article means it's a general statement.

Bevo acqua = I drink the water (specific)
Bevo l'acqua = I drink water (general)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

So, if I understand that correctly, I would say "bevo acqua" to say "I typically drink water," and I would use "Bevo l'acqua" if someone's asking about me drinking from a specific body of water, such as, "Bevo l'acqua é un bitollo." Correct me if I'm wrong, I tried to say, "I drink the water from the bottle."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Other way around.

"Bevo acqua" = I am drinking the water that is in front of me.
"Bevo l'acqua" = I typically drink water (not necessarily at the moment).

"I drink the water from the bottle" would be more like "Bevo acqua dalla bottiglia."

https://ciaoitaliablog.wordpress.com/classes/italian-preposition-with-definite-article/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

Thank you, I just started Italian this evening, so I'm getting a bit ahead of myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

You'll get it in time! Learn from your mistakes and you'll be golden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cecilycitr

it said the correct answer was "the children drink the water"? I thought children was 'bambini'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konstantin244047

I wrote "The boys drink the water" but it was not accepted. "l'" means "the" so my sentence should be right. Also I that would be my 28th correct sentence, but anyway continue the good work! This is my favorite app!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konstantin244047

Rae.F Thank you! At first I didn't see your comment


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah549647

so the 'I' at the start means 'the', but doesn't the 'l' in 'l'acqua' mean 'the' as well? Meaning it should translate to 'The boys drink the water" can someone explain pls?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Different languages use articles differently. Just because Italian uses it in certain contexts does not mean English needs to use it all the time in the same contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lonny732728

Why was i penalized for sayinf "the" water?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ege671531

Isn't it should be "the water"? Because it has "l'" in front of aqua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Italian is not a mirror of English. Different language, different grammar rules, different way of saying things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milad.es

Drink or drinks???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

The boys drink.

The boy drinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milad.es

Drink or drinks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Its_HxneyBee

Hello everyone, i just wanted to say wow, u cant believe that there is 100 messages


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

If you have a question, please ask it, but kindly refrain from cluttering this learners forum with off-topic chatter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roma736042

How come it's "l'acqua" but the answer is not "the water"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2411

Because Italian is not just English with different words. It also has different grammar and different ways of saying things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aryarhu

Can we write boys drink the water?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jehsiecar

How do I know when to use l'acqua and acqua?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dipti78297

What is the difference between I and I'

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