"Hun tager til lægen."

Translation:She goes to the doctor.

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Qermit
Qermit
  • 20
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

"Tager" is more misleading than the "doktoren/lægen" choice

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adcoon
adcoon
  • 25
  • 21
  • 19
  • 12

It's perfectly normal in Danish. You'll hear Danes say "Hun tager til lægen" just as often (or more often) as "Hun går til lægen." It may sound strange to non-natives, but Danes find nothing strange about it. You probably won't hear us say "Hun tager/går til doktoren" quite as often, however.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcLane2

Why is "takes herself" not accepted? As in the English formal register eg "She should take herself to the doctor". Or would that have to be "tager sig"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 92

I think it is not accepted because it's barely used.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Timmy_The_Kid
Timmy_The_Kid
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6

Can you say: Hun går til doktoren?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/22decembre
22decembre
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5

You use går only when walking.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adcoon
adcoon
  • 25
  • 21
  • 19
  • 12

No, the Danish word "gå" is used both like the English "walk" and "go", and possibly a few other ones, depending on how you use it.

"Jeg går på vejen" means "I walk on the road", but "Jeg går i skole" means "I go to school" even if your parents drive you to school every day and you never actually walk. However, "Jeg går TIL skole (hver dag)" means "I walk to school (every day)," and yet "Jeg går til fodbold" means you play football in a club or something, not that you walk to see or play in a game.

So it's not as simple.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/22decembre
22decembre
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5

Jo, men du går ikke til Brazilien hvis du bor i Europa !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adcoon
adcoon
  • 25
  • 21
  • 19
  • 12

Det ville i hvert fald blive en lang tur hen over Sibirien og ned gennem USA :) Men i det her tilfælde er det ikke så meget et bestemt sted men en person du går til. "Jeg går til lægen" kunne jeg da godt finde på at sige uanset om jeg så gik, kørte eller tog bussen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adcoon
adcoon
  • 25
  • 21
  • 19
  • 12

You can. I think "lægen" is more common here, though. I believe "doktor" is mostly used as a title before a name.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa79533

How do you know when to use tager, and when to use går, or would either one be acceptable?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 92

"Tage til" is usually used if you have a certain goal you're going to. "Gå til" can also be used, but only if you can reasonably assume that there's walking involved. "Jeg går til lægen med bilen" sounds odd, you'd use køre here instead.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ycUvuSap
ycUvuSap
  • 21
  • 14
  • 7
  • 495

Betyder "læge" "physician" på engelsk? Selvfølligt betyder "doktor" "doctor".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 92

Læge is the profession, doktor is the title. Calling a physician doktor is uncommon, mostly children's speech.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas_Slo
Thomas_Slo
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 20
  • 20
  • 20
  • 19
  • 16
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

Is there a Swede here who could tell me if it's possible to say "Hon tar till läkaren." in Swedish?

1 year ago
Learn Danish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.