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"Gracias a Dios."

Translation:Thank God.

5 years ago

102 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SneakyFerret

I feel like "a Dios" and "adios" is going to give me some trouble.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleatkilty

Yea 'adios' is literally 'to God', maybe 'to God [with you]'. Shows the Catholic Spanish roots of the language. Just like we say '[God] bless you' when someone sneezed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

"Good-bye" is also said to be a contraction of "God be with ye."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aprit
aprit
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I did not know that nohaypan!! thanks for sharing that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SageTX

That's a stretch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SemperDoctrina

I was kind of thinking that too, but it seems true looking through the first page of a Google search

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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It's the same in French . Adios = Adieu (litterally: "à Dieu")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rororo_Your_Boat

Similar in Irish: hello: dia dhuit (DEEYA GWITch) means God be with you and goodbye is dia is mhuire dhuit (DEEYAS MWURAH GWITch) means God and Mary be with you. Believe it or not

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buddytheduck
Buddytheduck
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dia is muire duit is the response said immediately after dia duit (hello) slán, and several variations thereof, is the word for goodbye

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

What did the Celts say as greetings in pre-Christian times?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanHoxton1

Maybe people have always made up the concept of a higher power to make themselves feel better and to scare people into submission to the rulers? So the Celts probably did say that even before the myth of Christian god was introduced?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weird_Ed
Weird_Ed
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It is just like the modern Russian word for "Thank you" is pronounced "Spasibo" and it originally comes from the Old Church Slavonic "Spasi Bog" which means "May God save (you)".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Turkish: allahaısmarladık

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

There is a literal translation in my native language (Czech) and it is used but it indicates that you are not likely to meet the person again, so it in some context it can be even rude. Otherwise one says what would be translated as something like "to seeing us again" exactly like the German auf wiederschauen/wiedersehen, or say ciao or tschuss (without the umlaut unlike the same word in German) with friends. Is there anything like that in Spanish? Does adios have the same connotations? I also heard some Spanish speakers say ciao, but that is a pretty international goodbye.

Also, I made a typo which really made me laugh - wrote Gracias a Dinos :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

Thank the dinosaurs.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

I would say, as you've already said, ciao is used frequently, but closer to what you're asking for is "nos vemos".

Of course there is also hasta pronto/luego/mañana (see you soon/later/tomorrow) as sort of a less final farewell.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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alright, thank you, and I am of the same basic understanding of the translation of "hasta luego/mañana/pronto" as meaning "until later/tomorrow/soon" and it makes sense that "nos vemos" or adiós would be for a little more undetermined length of farewell..

hmm.. come to think of it, I'm not sure that I've really heard anyone saying it that wasn't quoting the old T800.. maybe that's why it's always felt smart-alecky.. hehe (=

I like the sentimental romantic feel/sound of "nos veremos de neuvo"

Thank you for your insight and opinion.

(it wouldn't let me reply to your later comment..)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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so are you saying that "nos vemos" is more of a final farewell in meaning? is "Hasta la vista" similar in that aspect? because somehow I always kind of got the impression that "Hasta la vista" was a bit of a smart-aleck remark, is it? I mean, would it be considered a rude way to say goodbye to someone?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

I think what I meant was that the others I listed, as well as nos vemos, were all of a less final feeling, at least in my understanding.

It's like in English. Someone I see frequently, I'm not likely to say goodbye to. I would say " see you" / "see you later" / "later " or such. I think that's where nos vemos/hasta luego/pronto/etc. come in, while adiós is like goodbye.

As for hasta la vista, Arnold, or someone quoting Arnold, is the only one I've heard say it.

Oh and another edit - I have used/heard the future "nos veremos (de nuevo)" (we will see each other {again}) as a final-for-a-while goodbye.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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Adiós is not rude.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pichucoduolingo

I am native spanish speaker and "adios" is "goodbye" not "to god". "Gracias a Dios" is "Thank God"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
alleigh25
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They mean the etymology of the word, not it's current meaning. The word "adios" originally comes from "a Dios."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pichucoduolingo

Ok, i did not know it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beedem
Beedem
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I live in the Dominican Republic, where this phrase is very common. I had an infection when I moved here, and my "dominican mother" asked me if I had still had it. I answered "no". She then said " Gracias a Dios" and as you probably guessed I thought she meant "Thank you, goodbye!" Like the shop owner off of the Simpsons. I started laughing and belted "ìhasta luego!"..... She didn't understand and wasn't amused.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dubwop
dubwop
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LOL. I heard (and typed) gracias, adiós. Wrong!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aprit
aprit
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SneakyFerret, I had put adios and they told me I forgot a space. It seemed like the speaker ran everything together so it sounded like she said adios instead of a Dios. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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I did the same thing, listening to it again I can sort of hear the pause, but still.. something I'll have to watch out for in the future.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanKing1
StanKing1
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I think it may be correct to run everything together. It makes us students's job harder.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeleeNess23
MeleeNess23
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"adiós" has the extra emphasis, so that should be enough to distinguish it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet

a Dios: To God -----------Adios : Good bye

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesseSaenz1

Kind of like Ishallah in the Muslim world.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

"Thank God" is not like addressing God or speaking to him so there's no "s" in the word thank. When we are talking to someone (addressing them) we say, for example, "Oh hey, you bought me a car! Thanks, John!" This "Thank God" (No 's') is like "Hey, Jim, thank John because he's buying you a car." "Thank God (because) it's Friday." "God" here is a Direct Object, (I believe, hence the a.) The same as "Thank your teachers for educating you.", or "Thank your friends for being there for you." Furthermore, the expression "Thank God it's Friday" is not addressed to God, but to someone (yourself) telling yourself to thank God that it is Friday.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pichucoduolingo

Thanks for the explanation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

You're welcome. Can't even remember why I posted that! lol!

Edit: I suppose I must have posted that in reply to tsemanarie's post about his answer "Thanks god" which wasn't accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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@tessbee. But my answer 'Thanks be to god' was accepted, probably because it is a common uttering. Not by me though!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Thylacaleo - I think your version "Thanks be to god" is the more appropriate translation for "Gracias a Dios" and makes more sense than my attempted explanation above, because mine requires an imperative (to 'tell' someone/myself to thank someone else [god, in this case]) which, in turn, would need the verb form "agradecer", and obviously, "gracias" is a noun. :)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I also typed "Thanks be to God" not expecting it to be accepted, but was happily surprised when it was. Didn't like the given translation of "thank God" which is also something you say when you feel relieved.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macellan

Thank tessbee

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psychopompes

can "thanks be to God" work as another translation to English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReginaBetty
ReginaBetty
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I used this translation and it was accepted, though I'd like to hear a native speaker's perspective

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LastStarkgaryen
LastStarkgaryen
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I was willing to type G-d and get this one wrong; una tradicion judia es no escribir el nombre de D--s.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

aleluya השבח לאל

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Muy interesante

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew642930

Also tradition not to say it either? "That piece of halibut was good enough for Jehovah!"..."All right, no one is to stone ANYONE until I blow this whistle! Even... And let me make this absolutely clear... Even if they do say 'Jehovah'!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knickknacks12

"Thank the LORD" is accepted as well, 3/17.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Although that should probably be translated "Gracias al Señor".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

On the radio bands you'll hear "Gracias al Señor" very often on Evangélico-supported stations that seek to spread certain strains of Protestantism in Latin America.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BevanWisha

Why is "thank you to God" not accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

See tessbee's explanation above.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet

Por qué no Thanks God ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It's just not the way we express the phrase in English. We would normally say, 'Thank God', or 'Thanks be to God'.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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There might be a subtle distinction in the pronunciation of "Gracias, adiós" and "Gracias a Diós," but how can we be expected to perceive that? The "report a problem" link gives no way to report this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

I thought Duolingo was saying, "Gracias. Adios." It was accepted. Now, I see it was Thank God.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rajennagar

'thank you god' not accepted here. Why?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Gracias a Dios = Thanks to God.

You are trying a word for word translation of Gracias into "Thank you", which is one equivalent in English, but not an exact match. The stem is closer to gratitude than thanks, as you can see when <<Muchas gracias>> is translated as "many thanks".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet

they did not accept Thanks God either.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

It works just like it does in English. The "a [person]" is what means you can't translate it as "thank you..." . "Thanks" without anything else has an implied indirect object* of "to you." But when you explicitly say "Thanks to Jerry" there's no implied "you" because in its place, you've specified a different object.

*or whatever it technically is

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
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That is now accepted as of 4/30/16.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wikadi

I heard like : Gracias, adiós.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagAonghusa
MagAonghusa
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same here. and I didn't lose a heart for entering it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rainier29
Rainier29
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Salamat sa Diyos

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet

Why not Thanks God !

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Niall778373

Why the (#/!+(%) is "Spiritual" on Duolingo?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GerryGriff

To an atheist adios now means "goodbye to God".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MThoriqMalano
MThoriqMalano
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I've been observing for a while... have 'Dios' and 'Agencia' always been capitalized?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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I noticed that too with agency, and wondered about it. Not surprised, though, I would think Dios would always be capitalized.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

Unless when referring to a god, or the god of (insert element here). I used to get hung up with accidentally saying "los dios/las dias de los muertos", which means the gods/goddesses of the dead, instead of lOs diAs de los muertos (days of the dead)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

Los dioses and las diosas are the correct plurals for gods/goddesses

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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Good luck with that...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apbeaulne

Why would "Thank you to God" be incorrect

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew642930

I've reported it as I put that!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Niall778373

No! It is because spanish has different Grammar

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IforGot2
IforGot2
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Is 'thank goodness' a wrong translation? Seems like it is very close to 'thank god'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

They are less synonymous if you believe in God, in which case goodness is abstract but God is concrete.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tseminarie

Thanks God was not accepted. I thought it was an American expression and those can't be translated literally, but you have to give the equivalent in the other language. Does someone agree?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

If a negative outcome has been avoided, the correct expression is "Thank God" (without the s). On the other hand, if you bump into God on the street and he hands you five dollars, you would say "Thanks, God."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

One might say "Thanks be to God," although that is probably pretty old-fashioned by now. I have no idea if Duo would accept it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeregrinaMia
PeregrinaMia
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'Thanks be to God' and 'thank God' are both still used quite frequently in Ireland.

For that matter, people also say 'please God' in normal conversation, in the sense of "if it pleases God", rather than "please, God, do me this one favour / grant me this one request".

Note that both 'please, God' and 'thanks be to God' are also both used in prayer.

Here are some examples:

Conversation:

'It's great weather for the farmers, thank God.'

'Jack was in a coma for five days after the accident, but thanks be to God, he seems to have pulled out if it.'

'Please God, he'll be back on his feet in no time.'

Prayer:

'Please, God, let the fine weather last long enough to get the harvest in '

'Please, God, look after Jack and help him to a full recovery.'

'This is the Word of the Lord.' 'Thanks be to God.'

I hope this is useful in the present context of spiritual vocabulary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

I very much appreciate your comments. They do make it clearer. I have noticed that people from the Middle East and India/Pakistan often say "Thanks be to God." struggling to put it properly into English. I asked my Hindi speaking husband about it. He had a little trouble picturing someone saying this phrase in Hindi but I asked him how he would translate "Thank God I found my keys" and his reply translates back into English as "By the Grace of God I found my keys." Also let us not forget the favorite of all my Catholic friends, "Iter missa est, gratia Deos." which translates two ways.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeregrinaMia
PeregrinaMia
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Ah yes, well remembered. I too have noticed Arabic speakers and others struggling to translate this type of expression into English.

Thank you for the Lingot! I'm very glad to have been of help.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeverinBokus

Wait, what? God doesn't exist...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

why are you forcing me to take the Lord's name in vain? I won't do it!
Yes, this is used a lot in both Engilish and Spanish, but it is offensive. I will try to get through this part of the tree a few times, and if I can't, without typing this in, then I guess I am done with duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

You can't use this phrase without using the Lord's name in vain? What do you say to give thanks to God in a situation?

"We made it through those tough times, thanks to God."

"How have you been?" "Thanks to God, I have been doing well"

"Thanks to God, the cancer is in remission"

Just because some people use this phrase in a way that takes the Lord's name in vain doesn't mean that it always is in vain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

You are entitled to this opinion. But I disagree.

Anytime you use his name cavalierly you take it in vain. Even if you intend to express gratitude, if you do so in a cavalier way then it is inappropriate. I appreciate that not everyone agrees. And that is fine, proceed according to your own beliefs.

However, do not expect me to lower my standards, just because you feel differently.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
alleigh25
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In that case, every time someone says "I believe in God," or "God has changed my life," or "Everything I have comes from God," they're taking God's name in vain. And when you say that's taking God's name in vain, you're taking his name in vain again.

That's not what "taking the Lord's name in vain" means at all. You're allowed to mention him.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

"I believe in God," or "God has changed my life," or "Everything I have comes from God," obviously do not fall under the explanation that I gave. Indeed, they clearly fall under reverent and thoughtful speech.

I appreciate that you want to couch your reply in contrarian terms. However, I have no interest in such immature engagement.

Incidentally, this is not a definition I invented. It is a definition that has existed since the dawn of time, and is generally understood.

Again, I appreciate that you may disagree. Proceed accordingly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GSToujou
GSToujou
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Duolinguess' Record of max. comments on right! xD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

Yes, thank you.

"if you do so in a cavalier way then it is inappropriate..."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

Again, let's not puts words in each other's mouths.

I most certainly did not reply to anyone telling them that expressing thanks to God for you cancer being in remission is taking the Lord's name in vain.

Our dialogue is on the record, you really can't even stretch my comments into the box that you desire to fit them in with a shoe horn.

I wish you all the best.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

At this point, the fact that we have 1) already determined that you agree with me. And 2) that you have gone so far as to quote me verbatim, justifying my comment. Yet still 3) are attempting to somehow validate your rant.

Is, for lack of better words, downright funny!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

Nor will you ever hear me say that thanking God for your cancer being in remission is a case of taking his name in vain...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

Using the very overused phrase, that I will not repeat, and that is the subject of this practice example, is taking his name in vain.

This however does not in any way imply that using the words "thank" and "God" in the same sentence are therefore automatically examples of taking his name in vain.

One is an example of using his name as a swear word, or as a common expression without thought for what you are saying.
the other is just using words in the same sentence...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

Rather than trying so hard to be combative stop and read what I have written. You don't disagree with me. You just want to debate.

I wish you the best.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

Where in thanking God for good events are you swearing an oath with God as your witness and then breaking it? That is what is meant by taking the Lord's name in vain. Showing gratitude to God for blessings is not offensive in any language I have ever studied. Even most of my atheist friends may think I am stupid but they don't see me as offensive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

I appreciate that you have created your own interpretation of what it means to take the Lord's name in vain. And you are certainly entitled to live your own life by this definition that you have created for yourself.

However, this is not what taking his name in vain means. Using his name in any day to day way, and in common everyday speech is what is meant by taking his name in vain. When you sincerely desire to express your gratitude, and you do so in reverence then this is of course not taking his name in vain.

But when you cast his name about, freely, in everyday speech, with no real thought for what you are saying, as it is nothing more than a figure of speech to you, then you are indeed taking his name in vain.

And incidentally, though I disagree with your personal definition, what I have described certainly does qualify under the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Hi FinnyWiggen,

I hope you got through the section rather than quit.

You defined 'taking his name in vain' as using his name freely with no real thought ... But it's clear to me that you are so aware and conscious of this that while learning the common vernacular, you are able to put thought and care into each sentence.

I think what I'm trying to say is that it isn't the words, but the user's attitude or approach which makes them "in vain".

And learning what other people do, with the clear personal decision that it isn't what you do could be a way to continue through.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnyWiggen

I appreciate your comment. I had to read it three times before I got the real intent of what you were saying. And it is a very respectful thoughtful comment.

I didn't quit. I simply clicked the "check" button each time it came up without entering anything. The result being that this word shows up in my word list as the one I am least proficient at.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Glad to hear you stuck with the language :) But what irony... because you don't wish to do the sentence it would be the one they give you over and over! :/ (Perhaps for your private use, you can turn it into a pray. It is but 2 of many words to start a prayer of gratefulness :)

(I'll edit my above comment to reflect your updated name.)

2 years ago