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"No es asunto mío."

Translation:It is not my business.

5 years ago

70 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6
Wonderboy6
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shouldn't it be 'mi asunto'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

Mio or mia after the noun is a matter of emphasis, as I understand it. It is not MY affair.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jwild94
Jwild94
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A good example would be the Spanish exclamation: "Dios mio!" or "(oh) my God!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chai529267

Thanks. Es no mi asunto is also possible then, if its just for emphasis?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Kierz_
_Kierz_
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Yes

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Or, No es mi asunto. The no negates the verb and should precede it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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When the pronoun is before it is 'mi', but when it goes after the noun it turns into 'mio' (eg: mi manzana -> la manzana mía). The meaning is the same, I don't think it has any emphasizing function, or at least in general.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/21deen
21deen
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So, Mama mia afterall is not some weird old lady... It's actually "mi mama"... I get this! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arron220
arron220
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For those interested in the grammar specifics here as well (most people I imagine!) - in the example Perriguez is giving, 'mi' and 'mía' also function as adjectives, and not just possessive pronouns. :)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oowowaee

I would love an explanation of this as well :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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It is a matter of personal choice or style whether to put the pronoun before or after the noun. Use mi before the noun or mio after the noun. That's just how it's done in Spanish. There is nothing to explain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kencito

why is "it's none of my business" not accepted?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

It should be added. Report it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noamdt

I second that

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyanracoste

It does now, it gave me that statement as an alternative translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
ElGusso
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August 24, 2014 : my "It's none of my business" was rejected!!! :-(

Too colloquial?!?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morhlon1

I think what the problem might have been was the use of the word "none" in your translations. Although the sentences "It is not my business" and "It is none of my business" arguably carry the same meaning in English, the Spanish sentence given didn't have any hard indication for the use of word "none." I Hope that clears up any confusion a year later xD because as I was reading the comments I also found myself falling into the same trap since it really is such a negligible difference in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RainerApfelsaft

"It is not my concern." should be added too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

I think there's a slight difference between "it's not my issue/business" and "it's not my concern/problem". In the latter two examples, it 'could' be relevant to you but you just don't care whereas in the former examples, it's implied that the issue at hand doesn't actually affect you. Any thoughts anyone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRed1
ErikRed1Plus
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I think issue and problem are the same, both suggesting you would be concerned over it. Business is something that matters to you, if it is yours anyway.

BUT, I do think wording of the phrase matters. I think 'it's not my concern' differs from 'it's none of my concern' and 'it's not of my concern', though likely minute differences that without context, would all probably work here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

If memory serves, I posted that because in English, the latter (not my concern/problem) is typically a negative statement that you 'don't care' about something e.g. your favourite shop using child labour to make their clothes. You could say "It's not my problem" but you couldn't say "it's not my business" because it literally is your business as you're one of the people affected and can also put a stop to it by not shopping there, by campaigning against it, and/or by writing to your local MP etc.

I suppose this is where dictionaries don't really help because issue/problem/concern/business may have overlapping meanings but they are not used in the same way in English in this context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArthurDidnt

It does not matter to me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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That's what I put, too, which sounds correct. I am not really sure what the difference is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danlg

Not the same as 'it is not my business'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarpeGuitarrem

Not my circus, not my monkeys.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nollymulli

No es mi circo, no es mis monos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

I think you mean "no son mis monos."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

"it is no affair of mine" was REJECTED???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tessmolloy123

Why not mi asunto

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

That is what I wrote. Reported.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Asunto > issue, business, affair... There's one more funny coincidence: asunto in those letters in that order is in Finnish 'living quarters', which in turn is a big issue

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimEsh

I wonder if it's one of those times in Spanish in changing word order for emphasis. Since it reads more like "is not a matter that is mine", it could be putting further distance between the issue and the speaker. But I'm just completely guessing here and would love an informed answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

Putting mio after the noun instead of mi before it is a matter of emphasis. It's not MY business.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoMonster
DuoMonster
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is this an idiom>?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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No its not an idiom, its a rule.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swede15
swede15
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it should be ok to say it is none of my business.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamppii

Asunto means apartment in finnish. Confusing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

I told them the same before

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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Should we tell Spanish speakers to stop using the word because it's confusing our Finnish friends? Lol.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junolynn

I chose "it isn't my concern" which is how it's said. . . or "I don't have a say in that matter " would work. In English "it isn't my matter" makes sense if one is referring to dead body parts . . . then again that doesn't make sense either because you'd be dead.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Very good! You made me laugh!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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It isn't my concern and I don't have a say in the matter are not the same in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoveldelRio

"It does not matter to me," should be accepted. No?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoMonster
DuoMonster
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that would be: "No importa a mí"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkNeff727

no.... that would be "No ME importa a mi". the "ME" is required, the "a mi" is optional.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raveyrai
raveyrai
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I'm excited because "It's none of my business" is a go to phrase of mine. Now I know in two languages!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evaestrellita71
evaestrellita71
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The issue is not mine......what's wrong with that? Frustrating. Colloquial?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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Nothing wrong. It's just another of many ways to say the same thing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

Another Spanish site translates this as, "It is no business of mine", which I think is a more appropriate translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aku77
aku77
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Another proverb?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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Whatever it is it's not a proverb

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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"It's no business of mine"? Sounds a bit archaic, but I think it should be accepted considering some of the other things you can get away with.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geodynamical

Would a female say, "No es asunto mía?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimLNA
JimLNA
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No, that would only change if the noun were feminine. So, no matter your gender, you would always say "asunto mío," and for a feminine noun like "cosa" for instance, you would say "cosa mía".

The same would go for if you are in a plural group. For instance an all-female group would refer to themselves as "nosotras" instead of "nosotros", but adjectives change gender depending on the nouns to which they are referring. So it would always be "nuestro asunto" and "nuestra cosa" no matter the gender of the group.

In short, treat "possessive adjectives" just like you would with regular adjectives--eg: "casa roja" v. "edificio rojo".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FSamie
FSamie
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Why not, It doesn't matter to me?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aug707
Aug707
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Why is there no "de" between "asunto" and "mío" if an alternate translation is "It is not a matter of mine?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jepoja

why not. it is not any business of mine

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna727913

I answered "It isn't to do with me" ..... I believe this would be used as a translation in the UK. ...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna727913

Anr ofcourse it was marked wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna727913

Opps....'and'....; o)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama
rollermama
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Could it be, It is not my issue

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesCaulfield1

Did not accept "it's none of my affair". Womp womp

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

asunto also means subject !

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da1cre
da1cre
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What's the difference between "asunto" and "negocio"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennisThom228797
DennisThom228797
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"It is no business of mine." seems to fit the mood of the spanish sentence.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacko606728

Why is ' it does not matter to me' not accepted?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AprendedorLento

It's not my business.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

It is not my business.

what i say when people bug me with personal info XD

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

asunto also means subject.

1 month ago