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  5. "Sie geht."

"Sie geht."

Translation:She goes.

June 23, 2013

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flariett

How can I figure out when to use Sie (she) and the other one which is Sie (they) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel13D

The difference between the two 'sie' is that the 'she' one take the singular form of the verb. Whereas the 'they' form takes the plural form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NourHomsi

sie geht : she goes / sie gehen : they go / Sie gehen: you go (formal speach)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Potyenyul

Does anyone else experience strange pronounciation as well recently? At normal speed the lady tells: Sie beat. As if she told a German word and an English word. I had it checked with others around me and all 3 of them confirmed this. Then when I switched to slow speed talk she said: Sie geht. As it was supposed to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keith39

yep, went onto the discussion page to look for this exact thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelixBinns

Yea, i noticed that too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_Rhodes

My answer of "she leaves" was marked as incorrect… would that have been something more like "sie geht ab"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

No, "sie geht" can mean "she leaves". If you want an extension of the verb to clarify the meaning, you can say "sie geht fort" or "sie geht weg" (=she goes away), but it is not neccessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_Rhodes

Thanks.

I had a vague memory of learning ¸abfahren" in school, in the expression ¸wann fährt der Zug ab?" for "when does the train leave?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

That's right. You can use "abgehen" if she is an actor and leaves the stage. But in colloquial speech, "sie geht ab" would mean "she parties hard" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel13D

Could this be "you (formal)" or does that pronoun take a different verb form than this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

It needs a different form. Sie (formal) always behaves exactly like sie (=they) except for the capitalization. So here you would say "Sie gehen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel13D

Alright thanks! That helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeetsb

What if i write "SHE WENT"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

That's past and would mean "sie ging".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lol760307

When to use 'geht' & 'laüft' when defining the term "walking"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tudoreanu

when i say "wie geht's?" the "S" at the end is from that "Sie"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

No, it's short for "wie geht es?" (how is it going?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cumbercube

Why is gehen and läuft/laufe both used for walking and how can you tell which to use


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eir77402

she goes feels odd.. seems like the context should allow "she goes walking"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ActionCat2000

It can also be translated as "she is going", which sounds less weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gretchen746712

I said "she is going" and it was counted wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Broomhildo

Does it mean going only by foot?

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