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https://www.duolingo.com/mazonemayu

Do you guys make lists, and is it useful?

Lately I've been making a spreadsheet of every verb I learnt so far, conjugated in every person and every time (2 atm) I've already been thaught by DL, coz I found the verb list here on the page a bit chaotic. (It only shows certain forms of certain verbs and not all of the exeptions).

It's a lot of work, but it's easy to look something up once I added everything from a new lesson.

Is this stupid? And are there any of you who take notes? Does it help you? Should I continue or stop?

Thoughts on this?

3 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
Knoxienne
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Absolutely! This has always helped me. I can't tell you the number of notebooks lying around our house with all my language notes and lists in them. This is how I learned Spanish almost 30 years ago. If you are doing this, it's obviously your learning style and you should continue to learn this way!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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I think writing things down is great! It is a good way to register things into your memory! Different styles work for different folks. Don't worry! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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I do this. I also use flashcards (my preference is ANKI but many like Memrise or even paper flashcards) for vocabulary study.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Continue drawing up the spreadsheets. But if you draw them up and don't do much with them, you won't remember much. What really helps is to write out by hand verbs (etc.) from memory or at first from a spreadsheet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl1
Cheryl1
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Not stupid at all! For me, writing (not typing) things down helps move them from short term to intermediate term memory. I only write sentences, idioms, and some phrases down. Never single vocab words. My brain likes to organize things in a logical use manner (in context). Everyone learns differently. In the end, your goal is to communicate using sentences. There are studies that show the act of writing something down activates areas of the brain outside of short term memory so more connections are made.

With verbs you have models: -ar, -er, -ir endings + the irregulars, many of which follow the same model of the irregular verb. Contiinuar is an example. There are about 20 other verbs that conjugate the same. Then their are the stand alone conjugations such as ser, dar, conseguir, etc. which have to be flat out memorized.

http://www.wordreference.com/ Is an excellent site which has all of the conjugations, infinitives, PPs, gerund for each verb. You'll also notice, on the left, a list of the conjugation model a verb uses and, for irregular verbs, a list of verbs conjugated the same way. I like it because ''boom'' it's all there! For ex: continuar: http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=continuar. Dar: http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=dar

It may help to create written verb lists organized by model (modelo) for review purposes. ...-ar, -er, -ir, irregular models, unique conjugations. Or maybe, typing it our works just as well for you! Looks like whatever you're doing is working for you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/un_programmeur

As stated already, it depends on your learning style. However, for me, this would be too much overhead.

I use Anki + WordReference for verb conjugations. Here's how:

I create a note in Anki containing the "model verb" from WordReference, along with all its conjugations in all the tenses (that I care about). Then I have cards created from each of these that asks for all 6 conjugations of a particular "model verb" in a particular tense. I think this really limits the total of number of pieces of information I need to learn overall.

Then, in my regular Anki flashcards, when I encounter a verb, I require myself to recall not only the French translation of the English verb (also known as the infinitive form), but its spelling and the "model verb" that it conjugates like. This way, I link everything together and I think it makes learning conjugation simple.

So, for example: if I see the flashcard "to act, to behave". I must respond with "agir (conjugates like choisir)"

(I need to be able to recall the verb and its spelling (agir), as well as its "model verb", which according to WordReference is choisir.

Then when I get a card that says "conjugate choisir in the passé composé", I need to recall: j'ai choisi tu as choisi elle a choisi nous avons choisi vous avez choisi ils ont choisi

or more simply: avoir + choisi

And then, later in life, when I want to say "I acted poorly last night". I think of agir > conjugates like choisir > use "j'ai agi

It's easy to set up and I can show you if you're interested in trying it out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

I've done a similar thing with Latin verbs. It is a good exercise .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nimfka
nimfka
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I have a separate notebook for nouns, adjectives, sentences etc. and a second one for verbs. In the beginning of the latter I write down conjugation and translation for irregular verbs and mark the irregularities. In the back I have the regular ones with only a translation. It seems like a good method because when encountering a verb I connect it to the part of the notebook and remember if it's regular or not. For me writing down the conjugation of every verb is too exhausting, also sometimes only a prefix is added (poner, suponer...) and not much else changes. Anyway, I really recommend taking notes as you can revise material in buses or moments of boredom :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
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Totally! I absolutely adore lists and I've made at least one for every skill. (I HATE wasting space, though, so I only write out the conjugations of some irregular verbs.) :P Keep going. As Knoxienne said, if you're making lists, it may be because that's how you learn best. :)

I make lists with nouns as well (and their genders) as I do the skill. When I come across a new word, I write it down. It's helpful later in the skill, when I need to know how to spell it or when I just plain need to know what in the cosmos the word is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReehamSaleh

I have a notebook and i review these words every other hour just so i wont forget.. So your not the only one don't feel weird ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Just add example sentences to your list.

Examples:

  • podemos ir a Portugal, ¿tú qué dices? - we could go to Portugal, what do you say?;
  • te digo que te calles - I said shut up
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supainanoko
supainanoko
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"¿tú qué dices?" doesn't make much sense. I would say, "¿Qué piensas?" Sorry, I just have a compulsion to correct peoples' Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeckaK

I have heard "tu que dices?" the tone is like two question ¿Tu? ¿Que dices?
"and you? What do you say?" It is used frequently where I live.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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España, Chile or Argentina?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeckaK

Ecuador.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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It's Ok. I don't mind at all. Just note that the source is from SpanishDict . . . some times I just grab random examples from songs, dictionaries or resources like 123teachme Spanish Sentence Maker, Google News headlines en español or Linguee

Tú qué dices does look odd to me but I'm almost sure I've heard Qué tu dices before in a movie or something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Curious how often do you hear these verbs outside of DuoLingo? Do you take notes from what you hear often? How often do you listen?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Yes and yes. :)

I don't do it for verb conjugations so much but I think I did back in college many years ago when I first studied Spanish and had to take tests. It's been so long I don't remember exactly. I probably should do it for certain problem verbs and it would help me.

However, currently I do make many lists of vocabulary. I fill up notebooks. I try to go through them and organize them in a more permanent "dictionary" that I have created in a three ring binder, but even if I never look at them again, the act of writing them down helps them stick in my mind. Since the notepad is always sitting next to my computer, I do see the list and review it often.

It may be old school to use a paper and pencil, but for me it works!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/margreett

I write down all words and verbs in a notebook and add the occasional sentence I need to remember and some grammar notes. I think the old-fashioned way, writing with a pen on paper, helps my brain to really get to know the words/conjugations. I don't even look in my notebook that often, because using memrise (2 duolingo courses) helps me reviewing. I'll stick to this, it works for me!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLdawg

You're not the only one, ¡Buena suerte!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I do it with flashcards and practice daily. If I miss a word form (or just didn't know it) in Duolingo, then I create a card for it on the spot. I've blogged about my flashcard strategy, if you're interested: http://gregreflects.blogspot.com/2014/10/using-anki-flashcards-for-vocabulary.html

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BreeCowan
BreeCowan
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I keep a notebook for everything I come across. I have printed things out, written down notes, etc. It's really helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awesomeness861

Hhhhmmmm....do I make lists and is it useful? Yes I do but not for Duolingo. I use it in school to help me study. I have never used it on here but that would be an awesome idea!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanneTofte

Hi Mazonemayu,

No, yes, yes - a lot!, please continue if it is something you use.

From the day I started English -- Italian I started taking notes. First on paper, but after 3 skills I started a spreadsheet. First it only contained nouns and verbs, but now I have tabs for 'Article', 'pronouns', 'nouns', 'verbs', 'adjectives', 'adverbs', 'prepositions', 'conjunctions', 'date, time, measure and number' and 'phrases, and I am halfway through my tree. Every time I start a new skill, I have look up every word in the skill before even starting the skill. ie. is it a skill containing nouns, I look up and make a note in my spreadsheet both the singular and the plural word including the article. If it is a skill involving verbs, I use the website http://www.italian-verbs.com/ to see how to conjugate the verb and list it in my spreadsheet. I find that we learn a lot of verbs, and as I find it difficult to remember one from another, for me it is helpful to use the search function in the spreadsheet to ensure I use the right verb and the right translation. For Adjectives I have listed for ms, fs, mp and fp - again to help myself. When doing the skill I make small notes to the noun if a specific verb or preposition has to be used. I use the website to learn new skills, because I learn a lot from the discussion forum, but to memorize and learn by heart I use the App.

It is a lot of work, and it takes me a lot of time, however for me, it is the way to go. It makes me remember better.

But I have to say that it really depends on what your goal of learning the language is. If your goal is to be meticulous and thorough to learn every aspect of the language, then it is a very good idea with notes. If your goal is just to learn a lot of languages as fast as possible and not minding not knowing and remembering everything, notes my not be that useful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

If it works for you it's a great idea. I find it doesn't work for me, however. Making lists seems to trigger a mental block that says "I'm not good at memorization", where encountering them randomly in Duolingo exercises, reading, and immersion slips past that block and I "learn" them instead of "memorize" them. It's a mental block and probably an irrational one, but you learn with the brain you have, not the one you wished you had. {grin}

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fettes

Nope, but every now and then I sit down and try and write down every Spanish word I know. Then I count them all and see how many I remembered. It's much more challenging to remember a word without any context!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaMujer91

I do this as well, but mine is not quite so organized. I'm thinking I should re do some of it. It makes since to me and it helps me but it's a bit of a mess and would probably help more if it was more organized. I am glad to know I'm not the only one who does this, I felt stupid writing things down. It helps me remember.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senora.kershaw_1

keep taking notes. for some of us it's how we process and memorize information =)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazonemayu

Thanks for all the answers guys (& girls), seems it is not so silly after all, as a lot of you are doing it so...

3 years ago