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"He hecho un descubrimiento."

Translation:I have made a discovery.

5 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KyleBotten
KyleBotten
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wow, that "he" is pretty much not pronounced in the normal speed

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

Or maybe is the the beginning of "hecho" that is barely pronounced. Regardless, you should expect that when one word ends with the same vowel sound that begins the next word they will tend to get combined in naturally spoken Spanish with no punctuation preventing the combination..

Now, imagine how the sentence, "Va a hablar en español.", sounds. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MezPahlan

Yeah it's not pronounced at all. Is the recording wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

In the recording no, in real life yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
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and sounds like "hecha", not "hecho"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patschge

why is "i made a discovery" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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It's wrong because of the helping verb "he" in front of hecho for I have made.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhiteUmbrella7

"I made a discovery" carries the same meaning as "I have made a discovery" in English, therefore it shouldn't be considered incorrect. Hecho is necessary in the Spanish sentence, but not in the English translation. Too many Duolingo users compulsively defend the software for no apparent reason, claiming that translations should be either interpretive or completely literal depending on which supports their argument. Translation is an art, not a science.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlish-stare

Maybe it is restricted to "have made" so that people learn to make a difference between "he hecho" (preterito perfecto) and "hiciera" (imperfecto).

Since those two tenses are used in different contexts, it is important to know one from the other. (That's why there's such an awful number of mistakes in my texts!)

The line between the two future tenses "voy a hacer" and "haré" seems softer.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
jonathanbost
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Eureka!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DJdeRidder

'I have DONE a discovery' should be accepted as well, shouldn't it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shawy89

No. Just because 'hacer' can mean 'to make' or 'to do' doesn't mean it can always mean both. Sometimes context only allows one possible translation.

I don't know if English is your native language or not, but "done a discovery" makes absolutely no sense in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DJdeRidder

Okay thanks, English is not my native language indeed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icepalace
icepalace
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If you cooked eggs for breakfast yesterday, would you say you made eggs, or did eggs?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdolphin

You would say "I made some eggs", but if you were a chicken you might say "I laid some eggs".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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If you were a chicken xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

For the record, another casual, regional usage would be "I fixed eggs." Which begs the (entirely facetious) question: Why is it that when morning has broken, the only thing that gets fixed is breakfast?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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It's extremely casual, but not completely unheard of, to use "did" in a case like this.

"What did you do for breakfast this morning?"

"I did eggs on toast."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielStam4

Crowns are for clowns, bring back old DuoLingo!

3 months ago