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"Vous savez ?"

Translation:You know?

4
5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bknckn
bknckn
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In spoken French, questions are almost always indicated just by tone of voice. Inversion (Savez-vous?) is mainly used in writing. In English, both forms are acceptable--You know? and Do you know?--but they have slightly different meanings, as you've pointed out. In French, there is no difference in meaning, only a difference in how informally they come across (you would not use Vous savez? in formal writing). Hope that makes sense!

151
Reply55 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSMT
RKSMT
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isn't "Do you know?" --- "Savez vous?"

I looked at Vous savez? and thought something like a wife letting her husband know about his affair and hes was like Vous savez - You know?

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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If you were writing the translation, you would indeed say, "Savez-vous ?" But when spoken, "Vous savez ?" with a rising inflection makes it clear it is a question. It is a bit of a challenge to write something down that can only be understood orally.

38
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeenagePolyglot

A married couple would almost certainly use "tu" with each other. Therefore it would be "tu sais?"

22
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Again, context would tell if the question needs an answer or not (you know? vous savez ? don't).

@erudis: Yes, indeed inversion is mainly used in (good) writing (I also use them in my short messages...)

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
erudis
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Maybe a French native can correct me, but I thought this was acceptable in informal speech, while the inversion was more common in formal writing.

11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeenagePolyglot

Yes, it is perfectly acceptable in informal situations.

10
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kushtard1

Drole

-3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traceylucyw

how can you hear the difference between vous savez and vous avez?

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
erudis
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Vous savez = VOU-SS-AVEZ
Vous avez = VOU-Z-AVEZ

They sound quite different.

52
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traceylucyw

not to me!

-1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
erudis
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The sounds will get familiar and easier to distinguish with time. Putting them on google translate and listening closely might help.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheyne
Cheyne
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Is the difference between connaitre and savoir not that the latter implies "how" along with "know"? I think of savoir as knowledge with ability and connaitre as simply knowledge. And I really feel like that's supported by how I hear/see them used.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHarpyEagle

From what I understand, connaître means to be familiar with. For example, we would say "I know this street," or "I know him, we met at school."

Savoir is more to know as a fact. As in "I know that you're angry" or "I know the answer is five." It can also be used in the sense you mentioned, adding a "how." So "Do you know how to drive?" would be "Savez-vous conduire?"

Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnySkywlkr
AnySkywlkr
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you are perfectly correct

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thj0dann

I know in Spanish the pronoun can be dropped ("yo tengo" -> "tengo"). Can the same be applied to French?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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No pronouns have to stay; only one exception: imperative: "mange/mangeons/mangez maintenant !"

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackalest

In English, we might conversationally end a sentence by saying "you know?" Do the French use "vous savez" that way as well?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Yes we do, and the in-speech familiar version is "t'sais" (= tu sais)

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Hey, Sitesurf, I have noticed non-French natives on social media write "j'suis... (whatever)" and just assumed they mistakenly dropped the "e" in je because they heard it said that way.

Now, I see you wrote "t'sais" which makes me think it is not unusual to drop the vowels that way, albeit informally, to sort of mimic how the phrases sound. Is that correct? A kind of shorthand way of writing among friends, not unlike how I may text my friend "Hey, JJ, 'sup?" when I really mean, "Hey, JJ, what's up?"

Is that the case?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Yes, that is right. "je" and "tu" are often "elided" in speech: "je suis" becomes "j'suis" and the sound of it is "shui".

Some words disappear, "ne" in negations, for example: "je ne sais pas" becomes "j'sais pas" (sound "shais pas").

You may find those in writing in novels or theater dialogues when the author wants to convey the way characters are supposed to speak.

But in the media, quotes are generally "rewritten" to look right.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Good to know. Thanks!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyr.kohout

I typed in "do you know how to?" and that's apparently wrong. I'm a bit miffed about that because I feel that's still accurate.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Your proposal is grammatically correct, but it is not only a translation but an adaptation. We don't know, from "vous savez ?" what is known, since there is no context. You could invent many other variants, but none of either would simply translate "vous savez ?".

  • do you know how to? = savez-vous/sais-tu comment faire ?
4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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When "savoir" is followed by another verb (i.e., an infinitive), you could translate it as "know how to" + verb. But "savoir" by itself is just "to know".

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stars17

What would be the french equivalent of "You know?" as in "I had to quit, you know?"

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"tu sais ?" or "vous savez ?" - depending whom you talk to.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellefantine
ellefantine
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When I hovered over savez it gave "can" as an option but apparently "You can?" is not a translation of "Vous savez." Is this just a preference thing or is my translation specifically incorrect? Thanks!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I find looking the word up in a dictionary like Larousse can often help you understand a suggested synonym that you find confusing.

In this case, I believe savoir is given the synonym "can" because when you "know how to (do something)", it can be said that "you can (do that thing)".

je sais lire

= I know how to read => I can read

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GailPintoD

Connais , sais , savoir et savez . Now I'm quite confused

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"connaître" is used with people and places and "savoir" with facts and things learnt:

Therefore, you know = tu connais, vous connaissez OR tu sais, vous savez

  • you know France and French people = tu connais/vous connaissez la France et les Français

  • you know your lesson = tu sais ta leçon/vous savez votre leçon

6
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moonlit_Way

What's the difference between using savez and connaissez... they both seem to mean similar. Can someone please explain for me?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jambobean
Jambobean
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Is 'do you understand' not acceptable?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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No, the meaning is not close enough between know/savoir and understand/comprendre

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nepixr

Isn't the "vous" term also applicable to a group of people you are talking to? It could translate to either "you" (form.) or literally "y'all" or "you guys", am I right?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Yes, "vous" is either a formal singular or a plural; context would tell whether you are speaking to one or several persons.

2
Reply3 years ago