"Es azúcar pura."

Translation:It is pure sugar.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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Es azúcar pura, no cocaine

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeIouch

Came here looking for a cocaine joke :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alli572843

"He says as he snorts it"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learner48

If sugar is a masculine noun, why is it pura instead of puro?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim9

azúcar can be masculine or feminine. It is frequently used with feminine adjectives http://spanish.about.com/od/nouns/a/ambiguous_gender.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weird_Ed
Weird_Ed
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Wow... I didn't know this. Thanks for la información :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nataliasjesus
nataliasjesus
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I also did not know that. Thanks :*

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SirGon
SirGon
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It is never feminine in spain. So azúcar puro should be correct too

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pesapesa

My Spanish GF says in Spain it's very strange to hear azúcar used as a feminine noun. Could this be another case of Latin America ways of speaking?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/judit-sama
judit-sama
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Yeah, I'm spanish and I've never heard before the feminine form of suggar ._. I was like "dafuq?". Latinoamerica's influence is the most probably the origin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenMillemon

i was wondering the same thing

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronTovo

It didn't accept "She is pure sugar". Why not? She really is!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

What if I wanna say, "it's pure sugar!" in a negative sense, like, after tasting a cake which appeared so delicious yet turned out to be overly sweetened... :( :) Would it be the same or would it also be correct to say, "es pura azúcar!"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katibryson
katibryson
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wondering the same thing!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgjohnsn
mgjohnsn
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It is pure sugar is also an expression, saying that something is so sweet it is "pure sugar." Just thought I would point that out, I know this is saying the sugar is pure.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I came into this discussion just to see whether it had that same usage in Spanish. Were you saying that it does, or just commenting on the English meanings?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jomomorgan

Could this be used to describe something that isn't actually sugar, the way it is in english?

"Mamá quiero este cereal!" "Es azúcar pura."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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There is a hint when hovering that "pura" means innocent. yet when I put "it is innocent sugar" I lose a heart. It's not fair!! (continue like this for some hours)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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(Lol) Have a lingot for this comment, Johngt44!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Gawd bless ye, ma'am. Every little helps...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SofiaTheGreat44

It's what my mom says when she looks at vitamin water

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/southpaw862

Why not "the sugar is pure"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

That would be: El azucar es pura.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susiseller

Is pure sugar the same as white sugar?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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I have no idea about in Spanish. In English, however:

Depends on how you define "sugar". Granulated sugar, the stuff you put on the table, is pure (99.95%) white crystalline sucrose; so for this, I would think that the answer is yes.

Brown sugar is granulated sugar with molasses added back in so it's only 93-96% or so sucrose, depending on how dark you purchase--so the question is, when you say pure sugar, are you only counting the sucrose? Or is 100% brown sugar "pure" despite having molasses in it?

Then there's all the others out there: date sugar, raw sugar, palm sugar, maple sugar...

http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/honey/sugar-syrup-glossary.asp

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erikkk
Erikkk
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I would rather interpret it as the sugar being undiluted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cubeheater

I dont know about you guys but the mans voice they use is too difficult to understand for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I don't think I have ever had a man's voice, but then I use the Android app almost exclusively

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DEcobra11
DEcobra11
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No sé, en casa siempre lo tratábamos como sustantivo masculino... ¿Dónde está el azúcar? Pásame el azúcar. Hay poco azúcar, etc...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Según Spanishdict.com, la palabra azúcar puede ser masculina o femenina sin cambiar el significado.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Azúcar%20

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/braunboy

A.K.A. Diabetes

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I have essentially the same question as Jomomorgan:

In English, "It is pure sugar" can mean two things: 1. The thing is made out of 100% sugar, with nothing else, like a sugar cube, or 2. The sugar that is in the thing is pure, but is just one of the ingredients: the crepe contains eggs, flour, vanilla, salt and 100% pure sugar.

Is it the same in Spanish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes it is the same in Spanish. There are a few cognates that are only partial cognates, but actually most people will call them false cognates. But this one you are asking about is two connotations of essentially the same meaning. These are very likely to be translatable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakeames1

Agian. The sentence seems backwards. I cant tell when im supposed to make it backwards. In my head it should be es pura azucar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Pure sugar still rots your teeth and makes you fat. The Stones had a song called Brown Sugar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes brown sugar is actually purer sugar than white as it is less processed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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el azúcar — sugar — Although azúcar is a masculine word when standing alone, it is often used with feminine adjectives, as in azúcar blanca (white sugar).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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According to SpanishDict it can be either masculine or feminine without a meaning change. They also don't list any region where it is more likely to be masculine or feminine which seems unusual to me.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Azúcar%20

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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That's right. The Spanish dictionaries say that "azúcar" is "amb.", that is, ambiguous gender. Even though it is used with the masculine article "el", when the initial "a" is not stressed and can be followed by a feminine adjective: el azúcar molida. The plural is preferred as masculine: "los azúcares".

http://lema.rae.es/dpd/srv/search?key=az%FAcar

There is a very interesting and clarifying chat about the use and origin of this word in the following site of the Instituto Cervantes:

https://cvc.cervantes.es/foros/leer_asunto1.asp?vCodigo=45119

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CadetheBruce
CadetheBruce
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¡Mi cosa favorita!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.k.a.t.i.e.

Ok so now I have learned how to say, "it is pure sugar?" &, "is it pure coffee?" & "I want him alive," in this lesson.

2 weeks ago
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