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  5. "Is maith liom iontráil na hÉ…

"Is maith liom iontráil na hÉireann."

Translation:I like the Irish entry.

October 31, 2014

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AoifeIRE

An Eurovision, nach ea? :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kjsoda

I translated this sentence to be "I like Ireland's entry", which was marked incorrect. Can you not use "na" to express possession (as "de" does in may romance languages or "of" can do in English)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

I'd have thought "I like the Irish entry" should be Is maith liom an iontráil Éireannach! I expect it's because the na makes it "the" entry, rather than "an" entry. Kind of like Poblacht na hÉireann is "The Republic of Ireland". It does accept "I like the entry of Ireland" though, which is more literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exeisen

I put the same thing and was also marked incorrect––can anyone clarify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

Yes, see my comment above.

In summary: Iontráil na hÉireann = "the entry of Ireland", in the same way as Poblacht na hÉireann = "the Republic of Ireland". The "the" is implied - "the X of Y" = "X na Y".

Remember that Irish expresses possession using a genitive case, rather than a possessive case. So "X na Y" is the equivalent of both "X of Y" (a genitive phrase in English) and "Y's X" (a possessive phrase in English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lang-guy

...for the song 'My Lovely Horse'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TuathaDeDanann

I'm not sure what that may entail. Entry as in... just any entry? Or is there a specific thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

This is probably a reference to Ireland's entry in the Eurovision Song Contest, like Aoife said. It does seem to work for other senses of entry though, including more literal ones: http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/iontr%C3%A1il


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TuathaDeDanann

Ah, alright. I wasn't actually aware of this Eurovision thing, so I kind of glossed over that comment. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

No problem. Looking back, I suppose it isn't obvious what Aoife's referring to if you aren't already familiar with Eurovision. You should definitely look it up on Youtube though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W3R3W00F

Definitely more than the French Exit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

conas a scríobhaim "Brexit". as Gaeilge ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory743155

Excellent suggestions, but we ended up getting Breatimeacht. https://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/Brexit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maguidhir56

I like to call it "Sasamach"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallMacGi

Dhá phointe dhéag!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodneyMarsh261

Could this possibly be translated as ‘I like entering Ireland ‘?


[deactivated user]

    No. iontráil can only be a noun in this sentence, not a verb.

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