"Síníonnandoiciméad."

Translation:He signs the document.

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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The first 'í' in 'síníonn' should, of course, be long.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berkhead

is SEEneen shay a more correct pronunciation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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Remember the 's' is slender - SHEEneen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berkhead

GRMA!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryji

SHEEneeON? With 3 syllables?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No — the o is there only to show that the nn should be pronounced broad.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Síníonn is pronounced with 3 syllables in Munster, and in parts of Connacht - the "o" is pronounced as a schwa between the í sound and the n. (It can be argued whether it's really a syllable, but diphthong doesn't do it justice either).

she-NEE-un in Munster ("0 ʃ iː . 1 nʲ iˑə nˠ" from abair.ie) with the stress on the middle syllable, or SHE-nee-un in Connacht ("1 ʃ iː . 0 nʲ iˑə n̻ˠ" from abair.ie), with the stress on the first syllable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Irish speakers don't learn how to pronounce words from a book, and most books don't really do justice to the normal and natural variation between the dialects, never mind between individual speakers.

Teanglann doesn't have an example of the very common word bíonn, but you can clearly hear the o in the Munster pronunciation of bíobla, and in all 3 dialects in ríocht, and in Connacht and Munster for díon

The examples at fuaimeanna.ie are also worth a listen - they include examples of bíonn, for example (where the speaker from An Ceathrú Rua uses 2 syllables, and the Corca Dhuibhne speaker uses 1, and the Gaoth Dobhair version might be 1 or 2!). It's worth nothing that they use a single IPA rendering for each word, even though the spoken pronunciation is quite different between dialects.

The key point though, is that in normal speech, these differences are almost irrelevant - unless they make the word sound like a different word, the speaker and the hearer don't even notice the difference, just as in English you don't even notice a person's accent, once it stops being "novel", and as long as it doesn't impede communication.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Interesting! Pronunciation of an unstressed o happens despite being adjacent to a long vowel? This seems to be an exception to §112 in Aids to the Pronunciation of Irish :

The digraphs {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}ái, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}aí, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}ói, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}ío, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}úi, and {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}íu present no difficulty as the vowel carrying the {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}síneaḋ always gets its full long value, and the other vowel is a mere glide.

where “glide” was defined in §46 as

The real functions of glides, then, in Irish writing is to indicate the broadness or slenderness of the adjacent consonant.

(This boldface was in the original.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cboland2006

Could you say contract instead of document or is there antoher word?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cboland2006

GRMA

2 years ago
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