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"Yo voy a su país."

Translation:I go to her country.

5 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tidenburg

Is there a reason you can't put "their"? It's used frequently as a gender-neutral singular pronoun in English. Su isn't indicative of gender itself, is it? (It said I should put 'her')

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/regran

The same thing happened to me. "Su" can be used for you (formal), her, his, or their. Not sure why it only allowed "her" because nothing in the rest of the sentence indicated it was a female's country.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adder2

I used "his" and it was accepted.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

I wrote "I am going to your country" and it was marked correct. I guess they have up-dated it.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mexicanfoodfreak

regran provided a very good answer to your question. If you click on the "Possessives" lesson and scroll down to the tips tab, you will find tables of the Spanish possessive adjectives and their translations. I wish duoLingo had similar guidance for all the lessons.

This is a great place to ask a question and get guidance from other members and staff. If you want duoLingo to accept other answers, you should use the "Report a problem" link. All of the possible translations of "su" should be accepted for this sentence. Perhaps they are pulling some of these sentences and the translations from longer passages.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IsaacMurra6

I just recently posted a similar comment answering a similar query. Su can mean: his, her, it's, your [polite] [usted], your [plural] [polite] [ustedes] or their. In short no, there is no reason why you can't use their.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
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Er, I believe you meant "its", meaning "belonging or pertaining to it", not "it's", the contraction for "it is" or "it has".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

tidenburg- his was accepted too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaEB1479
SamanthaEB1479
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"Their" is actually not a singular pronoun. It is a plural pronoun. Although it is often used as a gender-neutral singular pronoun, it is not gramatically correct to use it that way. Instead of using "their" as a singular pronoun in English, you should use "he" or "she".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isaac995879

Actually, in English, which is the format for the answer, it would be completely grammatically correct to say their. Although its origin is plural, "their" evolved over time because people prefer not to say "he or she" or "his or hers," as they would be used quite commonly and are heavy phrases. The first instances of this change occured in poetry and music due to it being difficult to use "he or she" or a similar phrase and have enough syllables left to make a rhythm and a rhyme scheme. I guess this page is for Spanish... I just got a bit carried away :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DroppedBass
DroppedBass
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using "their" is more politically correct than "his/her"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dadatic
dadaticPlus
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Anyway, concerning the Spanish sentence, "su" may refer to multiple people so it can be translated as "their" even with the conventional plural function. This could be a possible context: "Ellos vienen aquí. Yo voy a su país." ("They come here. I go to their country.")

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kooky13

I used "your" for "su" here and wasn't marked wrong.

Edit: based on http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/possadj.htm "su" can mean your when your speaking formally I guess?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

*when you're speaking

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ianGre
ianGre
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I wrote I go to her land, and got marked wrong. :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ianGre
ianGre
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I did it again in revision!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

iangre- more specific to say country

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MMM621
MMM621
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Me too! Land, nation & country are all correct answers....it would seem.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

All of the following answers should be acceptable:

I go to his country I go to her country I go to their county (ustedes, su is singular because "país" is singular) I go to your country (usted)

If you are marked wrong, use the "Report a Problem" function

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin611028

Why isn't "I go to her homeland" correct? I thought it was interchangeable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aleake
aleake
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" I go " is almost never proper English without a adverb. This sentence should have "a lot" at the end of the sentence, or "never " before "go" or some variation of the above.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dadatic
dadaticPlus
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Neither “a lot” nor “never” are in the original sentence, so that would not be a correct translation. It would be preferable to change tense, maybe using the present continuous in the English sentence, if you think it sounds more natural that way.

However, I think you can imagine situations where the present simple can work without an explicit adverb. The adverb would be implicit in the context. For example:

– What do you do when you miss your foreign friends?

– I go to their country.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobioye88

Who says I "go" to your country in this century

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miwade

Lots of people.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remeiil
remeiil
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I put "I come to your country" but obviously marked wrong because DU can be very literal sometimes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

To come = venir

To go = ir

Come and go are different words

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockwurm
Rockwurm
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Shouldnt "I will go to your country" be accepted as well? If not, what would be the spanish equivalent?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephrox
stephrox
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Voy a ir a su pais or Voy a ir a tu pais would be the Spanish equivalent That's future tense (well simple future) they wouldn't give you that until later chapters all sentences up to this point would be only in present tense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockwurm
Rockwurm
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Aah yes that makes sense :) thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweetbluesky

Could this also mean "I am going to your/her/his country"? - or does this form never indicate -ing?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remeiil
remeiil
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Yes this translation would also be correct I believe

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweetbluesky

Awesome - thanks!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

I also thought "I am going to her country" sounded much more natural in English than "I go to her country", but I am not sure if this would be a correct translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AidanHoolachan

I agree, this seems to be an error.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyLewis0

I thought country was nacion....confused

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susannafulcher

Waa that is what i said and it marked it wrong

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed.MagdyII

What's the difference between " ir " and " voy " ???

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remeiil
remeiil
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Voy is a conjugation of ir. ir is the infinitive, think "to go" and voy is "I go". So voy, vas and van, for example, are all conjugations of ir. I hope that helps.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnyeCheng1

Hey

8 months ago