Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Tá tú i do chónaí i gCeanada ach tá mé i mo chónaí sa Bhrasaíl."

Translation:You are living in Canada but I am living in Brazil.

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL
AlmogL
  • 25
  • 20
  • 10

When is "in" used and when "sa"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrJackHackett

i = "in", in = "in" (when the next word starts with vowel), sa = "in the", san = "in the" (when the next word starts with vowel)

In English most country names do not have the definite article with a few exceptions like the Netherlands. In Irish it is the other way around most have the definite article, with a few exceptions like Sasana.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/exeisen
exeisen
  • 19
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 7

Does which preposition gets used with countries have anything to do with gender, as it does in French (en France (f) vs. au Canada (m))?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1483

No; the choice of i vs. sa vs. san vs. sna depends on whether the country doesn’t take an article; takes an article, is singular, and begins with a consonantal sound; takes an article, is singular, and begins with a vowel sound; or takes an article and is plural, respectively. It is common for feminine countries of the second declension to take an article, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
  • 25
  • 21
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4

Since this is my first encounter with Ceanada agus Brasaíl, what specifically causes us to use "i Ceanada" and "sa Bhrasaíl" in these examples? Is Canada a country that does not take the definite article in Gaeilge, but Brazil does?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

That's exactly why it's i gCeanada but sa Bhrasaíl.

2 years ago