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  5. "Você precisa tomar um banho."

"Você precisa tomar um banho."

Translation:You need to take a bath.

June 24, 2013

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGull

You need to drink a bath. That was my first thought.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Lol I gotta admit it's pretty funny. XD In Spanish, "tomar" also means to drink. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva1990

In Brazilian Portuguese too :) Eu tomo cerveja. And in English it works the same way. I have a shower, I have a beer. Or I'm having a beer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schattenparker

The etymology of tomar seems unclear: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/tomar#Etymology_3 so maybe originally "take a stance" (Lat. autumo)

But I will memorise it as "to take in" (the bath as a treatment).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marvincorea

You smell me from there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiaSala

Are there any easy rules to remember as to when 'precisa de' is needed vs. only 'precisa'. Be nice to nail that one down, now I am going on intuition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

Precisar + verb -> no preposition

Precisar followed by a noun -> obligatory


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiaSala

Obrigado! I was guessing this but DL has tripped me up at least once, now that I know this I will pay full attention to when this reappears. Lingot sent!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy541202

Except in PT Portuguese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samosborn88

tomar banho is literally "shower" sim? what is more common, to say "take a shower": tomar um banho, or just "shower": tomar banho?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

We tipically say "tomar banho". When we say "tomar um banho" it sometimes refer to a shower where you'll spend a long time, maybe because you are too dirty or too tired. But they can also be interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValeriaPezzino

Is the word" banho" really pronounced like that? I thought" nh" was more similar to a Spanish" ñ, maybe a little less pronounced but in the audio I heard "BANO"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucast3

You are right, Valeria. Currently (February 11, 2016) the pronunciation of the word "banho" is wrong, she really says "bano" during the phrase.

Let's report that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FellipeEN

"banho" em português se fala assim mesmo. "Bath" in Portuguese speaking anyway. I'm brazilian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva1990

Only difference is that the "n" is pronounced closed in Spanish and most other languages


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balamcat

You need a bath should be accepted too, it is how we would say it in America most of the time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuniorRamone

Why in English is not "must to". Is it due to a "modal verb rule"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

Most modals don't require to. Some exceptions are have to and ought to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jccesinha

Me digam, por que está errado esta resposta? you do need to take a shower


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"a shower" também está correto e é bastante utilizado no inglês americano.

"you do need..." enfatiza a ação, como sendo "você realmente precisa..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrannySlasher

Is "um" optional here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes, it's optional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amy41602

How would you say "you need to take a shower"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElenaMigun

What's wrong with "You need to bath"? In other phrase "tomar um banho" was translated as "to bath"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalcolmN

To "bathe" is for sea, river or swimming pool, but for making use of the bath in the bathroom the verb is "bath".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LawnMoa

No, to bathe is to take a bath, period; doesn't matter where. Bathe is just the verb form of bath, like how house (pronounced with a z) is the verb form of house (pronounced with an s).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalcolmN

With respect, I don't know what your conception of English usage is, but for British English your statement is simply incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LawnMoa

Kiwi English, so the differentiation might've been lost, but I've never heard of what you said being the case; or bath being a verb for that matter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalcolmN

Pleased to let you know, old boy (or good lady)!

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