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  5. "Lui ha il mio pranzo."

"Lui ha il mio pranzo."

Translation:He has got my lunch.

June 25, 2013

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franco_Incitti

"My":

Singular Feminine = "la mia"

Singular Masculine = "il mio"

Plural Feminine = "le mie"

Plural Masculine = "i miei"

Now why is the article required?... Because it is just a rule that must be memorized when talking about possessives in Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unpocodeaire

As a rule, the Italian possessive adjectives are preceded by definite articles:

la mia camicia (my shirt) il nostro amico (our friend) i vostro vicini (your neighbor) i suoi libri (his/her books)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilouuuu

Couldn't it also be "he HAS my lunch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katiemullins1

So "pranzo" can also refer to the food that you will be eating for lunch (ie. I brought my lunch to work today) as well as the meal event? I understand that would make it just like English but I am still surprised


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

To round out what you're saying, "il pranzo" is the noun phrase "the lunch" where the verb form "pranzo" is the first person singular simple present conjugation of pranzare, which means "to eat lunch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeroeOMER

I missed this previously...thanks for your contribution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adesalme2004

Why is the "il" needed here? Why not simply "Lui ha mio pranzo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Why I cannot explain, but, yes, it is needed. See the following website for how: http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare132a.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sherry123

why does the il have to go before mio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/positano

that is the amusement of learning foreign languages, it differs from your own!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punkmom

Here is a table showing how the possessive adjectives are used in Italian. Apparently they always have the definite article before them. http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare132a.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyJefferies

why does ha sound so much like e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

I think that's just the "il" coming so quickly after it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roxanne839598

Why is there il in this sentence. "He has the my lunch". Makes no sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex_Kinsey

Not if you translate it word-for-word into English, but in Italian it's correct grammar. The simplest answer I can give is because different languages do things in different ways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

It makes no sense in English. But Italian grammar is not the same as English grammar. Italian grammar requires a "the" in sentences like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Roxanne839598: I recommend modern Greek to see another language that uses the definite article in much the same way. It makes sense. But yes, it is different from English and some other languages, including Spanish long form possessive adjectives (often), e.g., la silla tuya.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHEETOSDEV

How, then, would you say, as we would in English: He has my lunch or He got my lunch? Two very different thoughts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

In English, although they are two different registers, "He has my lunch" and "He's got my lunch" mean the same thing.

Sometimes, "He got my lunch" means "He received my lunch", which is the past tense: "(Lui) ha ricevuto il mio pranzo."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHEETOSDEV

Actually, the distinction is between He got my lunch (For Me). He's got MY Lunch. and He has my lunch. Future


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monique91011

My answer is correct.....isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

No, "My answer" is "La mia risposta".

"Lui ha il mio pranzo" is "He has my lunch".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guy.s

Why can't it translate to "He is eating my lunch"? Isn't "having lunch" = "eating lunch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

"having [food]" = "eating [food]" is the idiom in English, but not in Italian. So if anything comes up here about having [food], then it means they literally possess it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geotwaddle

Guy.s: I read the "ha" in the sentence as in possession that doesn't imply that he is consuming the [my] lunch. I read the sentence literally: "He has my lunch." Io sono un bambino in understanding Italian but I think actually that "having lunch" may be an American English idiom for eating lunch. I think the Italians "prendere," or "take lunch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guy.s

Capisco, grazie!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libster17

He has my dinner...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

"pranzo" is "lunch"
"cena" is "dinner"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JRo349155

Terrible grammar....."has got".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

It's informal. It's fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SasukeUchimaki

Grazzie, not grazie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2469

No, according to all of the dictionaries, it is grazie.

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