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"Usted habló con la norteamericana."

Translation:You talked to the American woman.

5 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/granny2011

I am a North American but I am not an American. I am a Canadian

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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We are being asked to translate from Spanish to English and not from English to Spanish. When Latin Americans (including Mexicans, Central Americans and Spanish-speaking people from the Caribbean) say "norteamericano" they mean exclusively people from the USA. The reason is that they see themselves as americanos (together with the "norteamericanos" and "canadienses") as opposed to "europeos", "africanos", etc. Some people say "estadounidense" to refer to people from the USA, but "norteamericano" is more common.

Certainly there is a lot more to North America than the USA, and the USA is not the only "united states", but it is usage that counts and not the technicalities.

Sometimes you hear the term "gringo" used but that would not be used in formal speech. It is often used pejoratively and many people apply it to anyone who does not speak Spanish. The word was first used in Spain and is derived from 'griego" because all foreign languages "sound like Greek".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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makes perfect sense to me, thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

This is an ongoing problem because there is no good word to define a citizen of the United States of America. (in English)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M132T003C
M132T003C
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“US citizen” and “US American” are pretty good. “Usonian” is used by some. There are plenty of good alternatives to the ambiguous “American”. Some of them ought to be accepted on Duolingo where appropriate (not in this sentence, “norteamerican(o/a)” should only mean “North American”, common usage isn’t always the same as correct usage).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

The only person I've ever heard use "US American" is Miss Teen South Carolina '07. :-/

"US citizen" works, though. "Soy de los Estados Unidos," or "Soy de E. U.," seems like it would probably work in most Spanish-speaking countries in the western hemisphere.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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From the best of my knowledge, "Norteamericano" means literally, "North American", but it is a term very commonly designated for citizens of the United States. That, along with "Estadounidense".

Americano would designate someone from the Americas in general, Mexicano from Mexico, and Canadiense from Canada.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel_B
Daniel_B
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I am, too! I think it all stems for United States people calling themselves Americans.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Equality7-2521
Equality7-2521
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Americano/a should be good enough. Mexicans call themselves such and Canadians likewise. The term "American" refers to someonefrom the US. The only people who take offense to that are those who WANT to be offended.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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The unfortunate thing is—seeing as much of the hispanic world is in the Americas, a whole lot of people who already refer to themselves with this term are going to "want" to be offended.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Broncos27
Broncos27
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Gracias. I always thought this was the case.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay.Ey
Jay.Ey
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People in Latin America would say they are American too (which is why they use the term "North American"). Mexicans could argue that they are North American too. It's too bad that there's no word for someone from the US (en español, estadounidense, but for this guy from the US, I can barely pronounce this in Spanish even with much practice)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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For what it's worth, as an English speaker who doesn't belong to any of the affected countries, I hear "American" as meaning someone from the USA. I know it's not strictly true but there's no malice to it, it's just easier to say than anything else. Canadians call themselves Canadian and Mexicans call themselves Mexican. I guess they could call themselves American as well and then get in to a fight with anyone who assumed they were then from USA, but it hardly seems worth the effort. I'm perfectly happy to just keep American as meaning 'from USA' and leave it at that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Sounds like the voice of reason to me... but I'm not from one of the affected countries either, so probably not best placed to judge. Frankly, as you say, Canadians are generally very keen to let you know that they're NOT "Americans".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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I think it's more that Latin American speakers use Americano/a to refer to everything and everyone in this hemisphere, and then encounter a different usage in English. Both have centuries of history at this point, no one is likely to change either entrenched position in anyone's native language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bf2010
bf2010
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There is a lot of resentment in the Spanish community (but not only there ->granny2011) when US citizens/websites insist on using American/Northamerican as US citizen. As for the pronunciation for "estadounidense" you can pronounce it easily if you cut it into syllables "estado-uni-dense" :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stagefrog2

I've heard the English term "USer" for U.S. citizens, but it's admittedly not common.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Frank Lloyd Wright favored the term Usonian. Never caught on...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay.Ey
Jay.Ey
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Haha--I live in Chicago and have visited his landmarks many times, but I never realized that that was the meaning of "Usonian."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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just to make things more complicated, isn't the official title of Mexico "estados unidos de Mexico"? So estadounidense might be ambiguous too...

Can we just stick to using the terms Yankee or Gringo? :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

When Latinos use norteamericano, they are specifically referring to estadounidenses, not Canadians. When anyone says gringo, I do not feel included, nor do I want to as I am Canadian. Or sometimes I playfully make a joke and ask if they are referring also to Mexicans and Canadians, always with a smile.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamayfield
jamayfieldPlus
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Con means with not to or so I thought

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Well, it's an auxiliary preposition, which tends not to translate 1-1 between languages. In this case, "talked with" and "talked to" have exactly the same meaning in English, so Duolingo had to just pick one for the 'official' translation--not to imply there's any problem with alternate translations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Anyone else think it sounded like there was an extra syllable in "hablo'.? To me it sounded like "ahb ee low."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whirlpool4

I heard more like "ahv low" and it confused me. Reminded me of the singer Tove Lo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfeErdal

"Usted habló con la norteamericana." "Usted habló con la norteamericana." it shud be you talked with a ameican o not? Can anybody explain me this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandora2
Sandora2
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I wrote "you spoke with the U.S." and it was not accepted ... I was totally convinced that "la norteamericana" also means "the U.S." ....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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With the whole country? Norteamericana is an American woman. Norteamericano is an American man.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandora2
Sandora2
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Why not? The sentences in duolingo are far from being logical and always out of context. So, one can imagine that in this example sentence the speaker could be a representative of a country (i.e., a prime minister, president, etc...) talking to another representative of yet another country and is saying to that person: "you spoke with the U.S." regarding such or such matter. BTW, in the example sentence it is "LA norteamericana" I would not have considered this possible translation with "UNA norteamericana".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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OK, so there are situations where you can say "I spoke with the US" in English, but not here. 'The US' is Norteamerica. Norteamericana/norteamericano are individuals. They're different words. Just like 'America' is a different word to 'American'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandora2
Sandora2
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Cheers!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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The US is not Norte América. Norte América runs from Panamá at the southern end to Canadá and Groenlandia up north. However people from the US are referred to as norteamericanos throughout Latin America.

4 years ago