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"I respect women."

Translation:Yo respeto a las mujeres.

5 years ago

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jay.Ey
Jay.Ey
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I found this to be helpful: With abstract nouns and nouns used in a general sense: In English, the article is often omitted with abstract nouns and nouns that refer more to a concept than a tangible item. But it still is needed in Spanish. A few examples might help clarify: La ciencia es importante. (Science is important.) Creo en la justicia. (I believe in justice.) Estudio la literatura. (I study literature.) La primavera es bella. (Spring is beautiful.) source: http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/intro_def_art.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dausuul

That is very helpful. Now I understand. Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Jay.Ey is correct and has a good reference.

But I have learned some additional things. One is that, in general, when a noun is the subject, use the definite article.

With a noun is in the predicate (say, as a direct object,) whether to use the definite article is more problematic, in that knowing whether a specific noun is "abstract" or "in a general sense" is more difficult.

Thus, these sentences, with the noun as the subjectm are no-brainers: La ciencia es importante. (Science is important.)

La justicia debe ser ciega. (Justice should be blind).

Los perros son mascotas maravillosas.

But....:
All the following sentences are more difficult in Spanish. These are all sentences that have been used by Duo.

"La unidad es mejor que el dinero." (Unity is better than money.) (This meets the guideline above, "money" is an abstract concept here. But.........

"Ella come manzanas." (Is this "apples-in-general?"

Ella es la mujer quien come pollo. (She is the woman who eats chicken.) Is this "chicken-in-general?

" ¡El café da energía!" (Coffee gives me energy.) Is it "coffee in general"?

Mi hermano estudia fotografía y arte. (My brother studies photography and art.) Aren't "photography" and "art" general, in this case?

My point is that, learning to use correctly articles in the predicate has been a challenge for me, and I suspect for others. There are many more rules/guidelines to use than whether the noun is the "abstract/concept" or not.

To get you started, here are a couple of the rules for articles in the predicate:

1) Don't use an article after "comer".

2) Do use an article if the object is modified by an adjective.
"El gobierno necesita mejorar la seguridad en las calles." (The government needs to improve safety in the streets.) ("In the streets" modifies "security.")

3) Don't use an article with an "unspecified" amount:
Examples:
"Encontramos nieve en la montaña." (We found snow on the mountain.) "Snow" is anunspecified amount."

Necesitas seguro? (Do you need insurance?) "Insurance' is an unspecified amount.

3) Use an article with "count nouns." "El niño no fue a la iglesia." (The girl went to church).

This is not a complete list of rules for articles in the predicate, nor have I completely figured it out.

However, my initial point was that, in the subject, Spanish does use the article, even if the English does not -- That is a fairly simple.

Hope that helps.

Here are two other very helpful references. http://www1.udel.edu/leipzig/Assistant/artdef.htm\

http://www.fluentu.com/spanish/blog/definite-and-indefinite-articles-in-spanish/

I encourage people to correct any mistakes I have made. I am still learning.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Hi! Thanks for this. I had one of the articles you referenced but not the other. I'm still learning too, but I think there can be exceptions (or maybe clarification) to the following "Don't use an article with an unspecified amount."

For example, you can use definite articles with non-countable nouns:

  • Un venado se refugia de la nieve junto a unos terneros en Cantabria

  • Protección de glaciares, la nueva cara del conflicto por el agua

However, "In Spanish, the grammatical significance of uncountable nouns is that they generally are not preceded by an article when talking about a portion. Example: Necesito sal. ("I need salt.") The speaker doesn't need all the salt, just a portion. Other examples: "Bebían leche" ("They drank milk.") and "Compraramos gasolina" ("We will buy gasoline.")"

Of course, you probably meant "a portion" when you said "unspecified amount," but I thought I'd add this in case anyone thought you would never use any articles with uncountable nouns.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Here's the way I've come to look at it. I'll address the above examples first, then summarise the distinction I look for, so if anybody only wants to know that scroll down.

Anyway, to clarify, we are only talking about definite article use with non-specific/general objects. We know the article is used with subject nouns, and we know it is used (as in English) with specific object nouns. So, addressing Eliza's examples first:

Un venado se refugia de la nieve junto a unos terneros en Cantabria - A deer shelters from the snow with some calves in Cantabria.

The snow here is specific in English as in Spanish, hence the inclusion of the article.

Protección de glaciares, la nueva cara del conflicto por el agua - Protection of glaciers, the new face of water conflict.

I'm not too sure about the source or meaning of this sentence, but it reads like a newspaper headline, and the grammar of headlines is often lax. For me "la nueva cara" is a subject noun, and a specific one at that, hence the inclusion of the article.

Sguthrie's examples:

La unidad es mejor que el dinero - Unity is better than money.

For sure, you could say this meets the guideline because "money" is an abstract concept here, but using this rule can cause confusion.

Ella come manzanas - She eats apples.

Is this "apples-in-general?" The rule regarding "general" object nouns can also cause confusion. I think it's best to introduce another category called "non-specific" which covers words that are used in a general sense but do not refer to all of the noun.

Ella es la mujer que come pollo - She is the woman who eats chicken.

Again, "pollo" can be seen as non-specific rather than general. To use the well trodden example, she isn't the one who eats all the chickens in the world. She eats some non-specific chicken.

El café me da energía - Coffee gives me energy.

Is it "coffee in general"? Yes. Firstly it is a subject noun, so it requires the definite article regardless, but your question highlights why. Coffee (in general) gives me energy. Or, to compare, All coffee gives me energy, but she doesn't eat all the chicken in the world, only some of it.

Mi hermano estudia fotografía y arte - My brother studies photography and art.

Aren't "photography" and "art" general, in this case? This one is more problematic, but again you can use the some/all distinction. My brother doesn't study all photography and art, only some. By comparison: La fotografía es la materia favorita de mi hermano - Photography is my brother's favourite subject. All of the subject of photography is his favourite.

So, in summary, it is this non-specific/some versus general/all distinction that I find the easiest and least confusing to focus on. Here are a few added examples for comparison:

Como fresas - I eat strawberries (some non-specific strawberries).

Ella odia las fresas - She hates strawberries (all strawberries in general).

Quiero justicia - I want justice (some non-specific justice).

Creo en la justicia - I believe in justice (all justice in general).

Tengo perros - I have dogs (some non-specific dogs).

Ella prefiere los gatos - She prefers cats (all cats in general).

I hope this helps anyone who needs it :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Thanks to JEllonz and Elizadeux for their comments. I will save them for a reference as I work further to understand articles-in-Spanish.

I know I still need lots of help.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patata-

The sentence "Ella come manzanas" is missing an article before the noun because the woman or (girl) does eat apples in general. "She eats apples": she's not eating them right now but she's not carnivorous or alergic to them, she eats them usually, with possible exceptions. Notice the verb 'comer' is put to the simple present (presento del indicativo); a tense that is used to express something that reoccurs (like a routine, e.x. Yo voy al supermercado el miércoles) universal facts (e.x. El gato es un animal) or something that is happening right now (in the present, e.x. Él bebe un vaso de jugo ). Now let's say there is a dinner party where the host serves apples and the woman mentioned earlier happens to be invited. The woman walks over to the buffet and starts eating the apples. She's not eating any apples she is eating THE apples from the buffet. Then we would say "Ella come las manzanas". So no, just because a noun is situated after the verb "comer" doesn't mean it shouldn't have an article. Everything depends on context and saddly Duolingo does not provide it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suus1987

Thank you, I find it very helpful!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dac123
dac123
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Why do we need "las" here? (is there a rule?)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Quite often when noun refers to an unspecified group it takes the Spanish article.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dofkeefe
dofkeefe
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But if it's not pointint out specific women, why wouldn't it be unas mujeres?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawileboy
mawileboy
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that would be "I respect some women", as I understand it (not a native spanish speaker, so i could be wrong)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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I believe you are correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

THE man can be specific. THE humanity is general. A woman is perhaps not and perhaps is pointing to a specific woman. Or am i overlooking the issue you are speaking about?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerkeslager

The alternate translation made me laugh a bit. If you mean to say "I respect women" and you say "I use women", you screwed up big time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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Two sentences are suggested as correct, the other one is "yo respeto las mujeres". Is it OK to skip the "a" here? (and why?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I think if the people being referred to are not specific, i.e a general group, the "a" is dropped. So, you could perhaps translate the two sentences as "Yo respeto las mujeres"="I respect women [in general]" and "Yo respeto a las mujeres"="I respect the [specific] women". I know DL has offered both forms for respecting women in general, but as I say, I believe the "a" should not be used if referring to an unspecified group. http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/personal_a.htm

EDIT: see below for an update - just to confuse things.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisOlmst

But after viewing your link I see an exception that could apply. The personal "a" is also used to personify the object. Most commonly when a person refers to their pet. In this case using the personal "a" would imply that I respect women as people. "a las mujeres" should be preferred because it shows more respect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Hmmn, I don't think that exception would apply. Although the personal "a" is used to personify animals, countries, and objects, I doubt it could be used to personify people. However, I get what you are driving at. Perhaps the "women" in this sentence, instead of being considered a non-specific group, could be seen as a specific singularity (womankind), which may then require the personal "a" to show respect. A native speaker would need to enlighten us.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

The problem is, with the personal a, we're looking for a specific person, personified object, or group. Thats what the personal a adds to the sentence, specificity. Women in general isn't specific; but it's good enough for a definite article because "women" is considered a generic restrictor.

I'm starting to think Duo-lingo doesn't know their stuff.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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It seems that after we began this discussion some time back DL has removed "Yo respeto las mujeres" from the accepted answers. Perhaps they have added "Yo respeto mujeres" which would bring it into line with another much debated DL sentence: "He knows women." There they offer "El conoce a las mujeres" for "He knows [the] women" and "El conoce mujeres" for "He knows women [in general]." "El conoce las mujeres" is marked incorrect. It is my understanding (gained from native speakers) that general concrete nouns used as objects in a sentence normally do not take the article. If this is true then "Yo respeto mujeres" should be accepted for "I respect women [in general]."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexio_Xela

Indeed, I got marked wrong for not using personal a and now I'm confused since these aren't specific women...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vsaturday

"Respeto mujeres" is wrong according to my answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adder2

@vsaturday probably because you left out "las"... which is required?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ezaltz

So how do you translate "I respect the women" if these women are specific ? You would say " yo respeto las mujeres" Then it is the same as in "respecting women" (in general). Something is missing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Originally DL accepted "Yo respeto las mujeres" now they don't. If this example is the same as the "He knows women" question then the two acceptable answers here should be: "Yo respeto a las mujeres"="I respect [the] women" and "Yo respeto mujeres"="I respect women [generally]."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adder2

DL accepted my "Yo respeto las mujeres" as a good answer today (Nov 2017). I didn't use "a las" because it refered to an unspecific group. At the top of this page though the answer is listed as "Yo respeto a las mujeres." So i still dont know how to apply the rules/exceptions.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Like you Adder, I was under the impression that a non-specific direct object did not require the personal "a" but I've asked native speakers about this again and received yet another answer that contradicts many of my other comments in this discussion.

This time they have said that "Respeto a las mujeres" is the only acceptable translation, and it could mean either "I respect the women" or "I respect women." All the other possible combinations - Respeto las mujeres; Respeto a mujeres; Respeto mujeres - apparently sound weird.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Ah. I was given the answer by Duo originally: respeto las muheres. So that maybe needs a change with explanation as to why when people go practice later? Gracias

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Little green men usually don't confuse me but i find myself confused.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ezaltz

It was a typo on my part. It was meant as "yo respeto a mujeres". Same as ella respeta a animales (in general)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wolfleis
wolfleis
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My understanding is that the personal a is only necessary if you know the women and las only if it is definite or about women in general. As the english phrase that should be translated misses the article 'the',las could in my understanding only be a precise translation if it refers to women in general which would conflict with the personal a.

To answer your question, it would in this case be correct to drop the personal a. (I would choose between las or a instead of using both)

Btw:I love the Swedish course,really funny to find you here and see that you also learn Spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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Thanks! I love learning on Duo, that's why I wanted to contribute myself. Haven't spent much time on Spanish lately though… now I feel I should.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wolfleis
wolfleis
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I can understand that,Duo is great. Instead of searching on the whole internet for bits and pieces of a language,we can learn it here in a playful way. On Duolingo I learn languages surprisingly fast, even Swedish with which I was totally unfamiliar. Have a lingot for that. I just hope that there will be more languages added soon. I wait for Russian and in the meantime I enjoy the ones that I currently do. I also must say that level20 in Spanish is quite impressive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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I thought that "a" was used when the accusative is a living being, like "Veo a una persona" but "Veo una casa".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wolfleis
wolfleis
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I also start to believe that the personal a is for all living beings instead of just the ones that are familiar to the subject,but I am still not sure. I must add that there could be a personal a in the sentence "Veo a una casa" if casa is a metonymy,which means that with the word casa not the house is meant but the people that live inside the house,but that is not used very often.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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And I am beginning to think that you are right :). I remember an example from school "Buscamos a una secretaria..." vs "Buscamos una secretaria", and I found a similar example here: http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/busco-a-un-chico.1935184/.

It says that "Busco un camarero que sepa hablar inglés" means that I am searching for an abstract person, just anyone who speaks English and can work as a waiter. "Busco a un camarero que sabe hablar inglés" means that I am looking for a certain known guy, a waiter who speaks English. There is also a difference between subjuntivo de saber and indicativo de saber here, which makes sense.

So, hopefully we are both right!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wolfleis
wolfleis
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Interesting link,you also get a lingot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Since there is still confusion, I would suppose erring on the side of respect is best?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

In English "I respect women" and "I respect the women" mean two different things. Would you say both of these things the same way in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

"I respect the women," could be like Joe Biden saying, "i believe the women." he is not speaking of specific women.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haley
Haley
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Why is "yo respeto las mujeres" incorrect? I thought the "a" was used when it was a specific noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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In this case, a personal "a" is utilized. The personal "a" is something used in Spanish to show that the direct objects possess a certain value; You use personal "a" when the direct object is a person or a pet, and the personal "a" is essential in Spanish. It is considered rude and incorrect to leave it out of place where it would be used.

Here are some examples of personal "a" being used: "Yo doy el dinero a mi hermano" - "I give the money to my sister";

"Yo veo a la gente" - "I see the people";

"El hombre acaricia a su gato" - "The man pets his cat";

Here are some examples of it not being used: "El muchacho toca su violín" - "The boy plays his violin";

"La chica mira por el gato" - "The girl looks at the cat" (Note that in this sentence, due to the absence of personal "a", the cat would contextually have to be wild/feral)

Here's an article about personal "a" if you're interested: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/persa.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Your first example isn't using the personal a. The a is translated as to.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fornow
fornowPlus
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Well I was marked wrong for not including "a", so apparently it is required

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klaus650857
Klaus650857
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Trump, is that you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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  • Nobody respects women more than I do.
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

I've read this thread and its like the blind leading the blind. We need more native speakers in the discussion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kijbob

Unfortunately, native speakers don't generally take Spanish lessons.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willy84k

Why do i need the A here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gul.mert89

No Pewds reference? Disappointed :(

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlowerHound

I ReSPecT wAmEN

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zorba333

With absent of "las" Respeto a mujeres should mean respect for women in general. This excercise needs refinement.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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No. It needs the article in Spanish. Also, respect for women would be «respeto para las mujeres».

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chloe_SG

Um it said women can be tias, but then it marks it wrong. What is up with that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el_fluente

Tías means aunts. So whilst related, it isn't quite what the question is looking for.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lanievjo
lanievjo
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Wouldn't " respecto a las mujeres " be correct? I looked it up, and both respeto and respecto mean respect!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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No for two reasons. Firstly "Respecto" does mean "Respect" but in the sense of "Regard": Eg. In that respect / regard. Secondly "Respecto" is a noun, not a verb conjugated to the first person present.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidGoldt

I got the yo respeto mujeres, but where did the a las come from I would of thought that is, I respect to the women ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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I was taught that you always add an "a" before the accusative if the object is a human being, for example women. When you're talking about something in general, you also need the article, here "las", so (yo) respeto a las mujeres" should be the correct translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidGoldt

Thank you helen all help gratefully received, Dave

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidGoldt

I got the Yo respeto mujeres, but where did the a las come from, I would say that would be I respect to the women. ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddiecat9

Why is "a las" in the correct answer?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SCOTTVELEZ

Tenga nada pero respeto por las mujeres. Vamos construir un pared. ¡Hacer mas mejor otra vez América!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luann438636

Nobody respects women more than he does!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faith-Ange1
Faith-Ange1
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Good for you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayoungethan

Si les respeto a ellas tambien

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quitschi4
Quitschi4
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Why can't I say: "Yo respeto a las señoras"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jensaint

I just got this question wrong when i typed "I respect women" in Spanish. I typed "Yo respeto mujeres". I understand I'm missing "las", but it gave a correct answer of "Yo respeto la mujer".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BasA.

It says women not THE women? Why should it be las mujeres?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yesandmore

I typed "Yo respeto a las mujeres" and Duolingo said it was wrong--told me it was "Yo respeto las mujeres." Which is correct?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meraw28
meraw28
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Pewdiepie anyone?

3 months ago