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  5. "Tugann sé fáinne di."

"Tugann fáinne di."

Translation:He gives her a ring.

November 3, 2014

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalcolmZed

Good to see that Pól finally put a ring on it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cdub4language

Excuse the Irish mistakes Pól, but "má ba maith leat í, ba cheart duit a cuir fáinne uirthi."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eikoopmit

As the green lantern of sector numbernumbernumbernumber dies, he reviews his options, and selects her as the receiver of the ring and responsibility as a member of the green lantern corps. Either that, or they're going to get married.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chloe305010

YES. THANK YOU SO MUCH. I LOVE YOU NOW. WE ARE NOW OFFICIALLY BFF'S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995

Am I completely wrong to be hearing "Tugann sé a fainne di"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

Yeah I keep hearing it too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

I don't hear any additional a in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rostellan

I did. It sounded like 'Tugann sé ar fáinne di'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

I'm assuming this is a ring as in an engagement ring, and not a ring on the phone? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

According to google a telephone call type ring would be "glaoch" or "glao".

"Fáinne" would either be a ring...or a cartel. I doubt he could pick up, carry and hand her a cartel, which of course points to this being a small circular band of metal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree29977

He could hand over control of the cartel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

You may be right! D'fhéadfá a bheith ceart!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartel_(band)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liamh3

Well now we know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFMurph

She shouldn't get too excited yet. Later on, Pól gives her ring to the boy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

How would you say "This ring is from me to you" in Irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proinsias123

I think it might be Tá an fáinne seo uaim duit. That might be too literal a translation, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaKane2

I hate that the language updaters found it OK to use the same word to mean from her/off her and to her/for her. Apparently they are so obtuse that they think slender and broad consonants sound the same even if they couldn't hear the difference in the vowels. I propose that people resist this stupid update to the language and stick with: dom, duit, dó, daoi, dúinn, daoibh, dóibh
for/to me, you, he, she, us, you, them all broad letter d which has a low tongue in the back of the throat

díom, díot, de, di, dínn, díbh, díobh from/off me, you, him, her, us, you, them all of these have slender d's with tongue up against the roof of mouth. The tongue peels away making more of a dy sound. Some would describe it as letter J but that is made with closed teeth. This is almost the same sound but made with the tongue and roof of mouth.

So until the powers that be think it is OK to use the same word de to mean from him, off him, to him, and for him. That is the day I will start using di instead of daoi. Two words that sound completely different both in the sound of the letter d and in the vowel sound that follows at least in the Donegal dialect and I would expect in several other dialects as well.


[deactivated user]

    I don't know whether "the language updaters" are obtuse, but I'm pretty sure that they're all dead, as the spelling reform happened over 70 years ago.

    Even Dineen used the same spelling for 3rd person singular feminine form of do and de (though he used rather than di).

    That and the fact that daoi means "Ignorant person; dullard, dunce; boor, churl" (the opposite of saoi).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phreyah

    Tugann Pól fáinne óir di.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolOBraonain

    Shouldn't the proper translation be - He gives a ring to her?

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